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'HOW'S MARCIANO GONNA HIT ME?'
Ezra Bowen
September 19, 1955
Challenger Moore tells in his own words—and Artist Robert Riger's drawings show—how Moore expects to win the world's heavyweight championship from Rocky Marciano in next Tuesday night's big fight
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September 19, 1955

'how's Marciano Gonna Hit Me?'

Challenger Moore tells in his own words—and Artist Robert Riger's drawings show—how Moore expects to win the world's heavyweight championship from Rocky Marciano in next Tuesday night's big fight

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(Sparring with Clint (Tiger) Bacon, a journeyman light heavyweight, Moore showed the escape bridge he uses when he misses with a left hook. It is merely the economical device of having the hooking arm ready to block any possible counter.)

"Even when I'm escapin' I'm tryin' to think of how to get myself back in position. I try never to be off balance. Like if he throws a left hook at me I pick it off with my right hand, use that same hand in that same position to throw a punch. You know how many of 'em can do that? You know how many? One. Me. Ray Robinson never saw the day he could do that. I don't fight like nobody else who ever lived."

(On second thought, going by what he has read and old-timers have told him, Moore thinks maybe he fights a good deal like Joe Gans.)

Moore on the uppercut:

"The uppercut is a defensive weapon. It's a defensive weapon, the only punch that is. Use it like if a man has you trapped against the ropes and rainin' punches on you from all angles, if you use the uppercut, even if you throw it blind, you put enough force behind it you're liable to knock the man out."

Doesn't Marciano use the uppercut as an offensive weapon?

"Yeah. That's why he misses so much. You ever see him miss? He jumps almost off the floor. Saddler, Saddler uses the right uppercut, left uppercut as a cutting weapon. An offensive weapon, but a cutting weapon."

(Moore thinks of "cutting" a good deal. He may have in mind Marciano's reputation as a "bleeder" and especially the champion's nose, slit in the second Charles fight. Don Cockell did not test the nose but Moore, a marvelous jabber, almost certainly will.)

Moore on combinations:

"I would say a combination was a succession of successes. You don't throw 'em unless you got your man hurt. 'Less you've first lured him out of position and hurt him, then you go to work with your combinations.

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