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'HOW'S MARCIANO GONNA HIT ME?'
Ezra Bowen
September 19, 1955
Challenger Moore tells in his own words—and Artist Robert Riger's drawings show—how Moore expects to win the world's heavyweight championship from Rocky Marciano in next Tuesday night's big fight
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September 19, 1955

'how's Marciano Gonna Hit Me?'

Challenger Moore tells in his own words—and Artist Robert Riger's drawings show—how Moore expects to win the world's heavyweight championship from Rocky Marciano in next Tuesday night's big fight

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How will he fight Marciano?

"I told you that. I'll fight him with a mixture of all the years of being in the fight game, the things I learned, the tricks I learned, the way I've been telling you."

SOME MOORE STRATAGEMS

AGAINST A BOXER
Opposing Bobo Olson, in the fight which made certain his shot at the heavyweight title, Moore threw a most un-Moorelike overhand right in the second round. He explains: "I wanted him to start thinkin' that's what I wanted to do. I missed him a mile. I just wanted to get him scared of my right hand. Then I went to work with the left."

AGAINST A SLUGGER
Like Marciano, Bob Satterfield was a swarming, aggressive fighter and dangerous because of his powerful punch. Moore stopped Satterfield in three rounds but only after setting him up for a knockout with a succession of stiff jabs which kept this strong one-punch hitter off balance. Moore is expected to use the jab on Marciano, too.

AGAINST A COUNTERPUNCHER
Ron Richards, Australian champion in the middleweight, light heavyweight and heavyweight brackets when Moore fought him, counterpunched with a dangerous uppercut. With Moore's jabs falling short, he lengthened them by leaning forward, virtually inviting an uppercut. But Moore blocks uppercuts easily and knocked out Richards.

AGAINST A BOXER-COUNTERPUNCHER
A knockout punch may take 14 rounds to set up, as in Moore's title bout with Harold Johnson. "I knew what I wanted and I knew how to get it—a straight right." But Johnson, who had fought Moore before, avoided the right by fractions of an inch. Moore pounded his body, weakening him, and the right finally landed in the 14th.

THE GUILEFUL ART OF FEINTING A LA MOORE

A good feint tricks the opponent into expecting what isn't coming or induces him to throw what he shouldn't. It may be only a subtle shifting of the feet or the apparently careless dropping of a guard. Moore is a master feinter but Marciano, once he is stung, tends to ignore an opponent's feints and just swings at random

Drawing back right foot (1) makes opponent think Moore is setting himself for a left hook. The opponent weaves to his left to get out of the way and moves into the path of a straight right to the head (2). The straight right should meet the opponent as he is moving because then he is off balance, or at least not in position to make his own counter. But if the right-hand punch had missed, Moore would then have been open either for a right hook to the body or a left hook to the side as a counterpunch.

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