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CURRENT WEEK & WHAT'S AHEAD
September 26, 1955
The New York Yankees clubbed their way to three straight over the sinking Boston Red Sox and—short of a Cleveland miracle this week—to an almost certain American League pennant.
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September 26, 1955

Current Week & What's Ahead

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The New York Yankees clubbed their way to three straight over the sinking Boston Red Sox and—short of a Cleveland miracle this week—to an almost certain American League pennant.

Harvie Ward, good-looking young golfing Tarheel from Tarboro, N.C., low amateur in both the Masters and National Open, rounded out a brilliant season by winning the National Amateur at Richmond, 9 and 8.

Ronnie Knox, 1954's most celebrated non-playing football player (his switch from California to UCLA cost him a year's eligibility), made a sensational varsity debut by passing for all three UCLA touchdowns against Texas A&M, clearly established his No. 18 as a number to watch this season.

Lynn Waldorf's California team demonstrated next day that it could indeed have used Ronnie by losing to Pitt 27-7 in the week's leading intersectional game. Pitt, with a new chancellor who candidly admits he likes winning football, is nursing a husky youth movement.

Swaps had his operation—a paring down of the hoof to remove his famous sore spot—and is now standing at ease in his California stall. Prognosis: he should be romping again in time for the winter season at Santa Anita.

California racing fans, meanwhile, fastened their attention on a 2-year-old hopeful: a big, strong colt named Bold Bazooka, who has already equaled the world record for 5� furlongs (1:03 1/5) at Hollywood Park and may be shipped east for October's Garden State Futurity, richest horse race in the world (gross value: $275,000). Bold Bazooka's happy owner: Comedian Lou Costello.

Sixty-three countries have signed up for the 1956 Olympics. The Russians will send a team of 400-450 athletes, about 100 more than they sent to Helsinki in 1952.

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