SI Vault
 
19th HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
October 03, 1955
AN ART REVIVED Sirs: Rocky's answer to Moore's "How's he gonna hit me?" (SI, Sept. 19) was as convincing as SI's answer to those of us who for a long time have despaired of the revival of the art of boxing. In 18th- and 19th-century England, boxing was not only a sport, albeit an illegal one, but a subject that inspired great painters, engravers and writers to some of their finest work. Each notable bout later produced sketches, mezzotints and prints that have become collector's items around the world.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
October 03, 1955

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue
1 2 3 4 5 6

I went home the next Sunday and I never did hear the finish of that broadcast. Although I have seen heart specialists several times since then, I have not been hospitalized. I hope that Senator Johnson has found in baseball a permanent cure for his heart trouble.
FRANK W. SIMCOE
Torrance, Calif.

THE SMILE THAT LOSES
Sirs:
I was thrilled to read Don Connery and Gerald Holland's wonderful article, Hey, Mr. Banjo (SI, Sept. 19). "Jolly Cholly Grimm" has the spirit that everyone in sporting competition should have: the spirit that says you don't have to win to be happy. Many thanks.
MRS. ROBERT L. ANDERSON
Glastonbury, Conn.

THIS HORSELESS AGE
Sirs:
Your staff and Mr. Jeremiah Tax deserve the gratitude of everyone in the harness racing sport for the fine job on the Brown Jug in your issue of Sept. 19. The coverage of the Hambletonian (SI, Aug. 1, Aug. 15) was fine, too.

Harness racing, although one of this nation's oldest sports, is not too well appreciated in this horseless age. I hope that one of your writers can someday find time to do a piece on the sport as it is practiced at the county fairs—there's a good yarn there.
WALT. S. GRANTHAM, Secretary
Missouri-Oklahoma-Nebraska-Kansas Harness Racing Assn.
Kansas City, Mo.

? SI will keep an eye trained on county fairs.—ED.

THAT CASUAL LOOK
Sirs:
Enjoyed your article and the photos by Jerry Cooke and John Bryson on Dogs Strange and Rare (SI, Sept. 12). May I suggest that you sponsor the Lhasa apso as a challenger on the TV program, "Place the Face?"
JAMES J. METCALFE
Dallas

GRANDFATHER STORY
Sirs:
As one of your original subscribers, I have considered SI mighty sharp, but in my unsolicited opinion you hit a low low with your "Shaggy Manager Story" (E & D, Sept. 19).

I was born in 1901 and have followed baseball ever since I first learned to read. My grandfather, a violent fan, was the first to tell me the same story, but with the setting in the Daffy Dodger days and Belmont the track.
W. D. ANDERSON
Warrington, Fla.

? SI believes a sporting classic occasionally deserves retelling.—ED.

MORE ON THE XOLOIZCUINTLE
Sirs:
We have read with a good deal of interest Mr. Reginald Wells's article, Dogs Strange and Rare (SI, Sept. 12), although nobody in Mexico seriously believes that the Mexican hairless was first imported from China around 1600. It is the traditional dog of Mexico, which has been on the scene for thousands of years, as shown by a wealth of archaeological evidence.

Continue Story
1 2 3 4 5 6