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GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION OF FAVORITE BIRDS AND THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT THEM
October 10, 1955
A bird-by-bird guide on where to find the most representative wing targets in America plus individual maps giving the geographical range of each species.
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October 10, 1955

Geographic Distribution Of Favorite Birds And Things You Should Know About Them

A bird-by-bird guide on where to find the most representative wing targets in America plus individual maps giving the geographical range of each species.

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Bird hunters in Arizona, Florida, Georgia and Tennessee can expect to run across snakes and should be prepared for them. Although the incidence of snake bite among bird hunters is low, rattlers and copperheads create a definite problem where dogs are used for hunting. Michigan has its own special problem—a dense population of hornets which enjoy the same locale as the best bird shooting in the state.

The greatest hazard which the bird hunter will face throughout the country is the hunter himself. The state of Tennessee, for example, predicts that at least four or five persons will drown this season while hunting; eight to 10 will be killed by firearms and another 25 will be wounded. The firearms accident probability is especially high in bird hunting. Walking through stubble fields, rocky areas, marshes and streams creates situations in which guns can easily be discharged accidentally.

Group hunters, in the excitement of a low flushing bird, have on more than one occasion mistakenly sprayed their companions or dogs with shot as they attempted to follow a bird's flight. The rules which apply to the handling of all firearms and to field behavior should be observed in bird hunting.

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