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HOW TO BE PROPERLY OUTFITTED IN THE FIELD
Paul R. Walker
October 10, 1955
There are very good reasons for all of the elements which make up a bird-shooter's outfit, and Arthur R. Eakins (left) of New Hope, Pennsylvania has taken them all into consideration. His shooting jacket and brush pants are forest brown, a color which serves to camouflage the hunter under most field conditions in this country. His hat, however, is scarlet felt (Duxbak, $1.95). Since bird-shooting season overlaps the deer season in some areas, many shotgunners are wearing red for protective reasons, either on hats or on their collars. The jacket (Duxbak, $22.50) is of duck, treated with silicone for additional pliability and water repellency. It has a bi-swing back for shooting freedom and a large, rubberized game pocket zippered into the back which lets down to make a waterproof seat. Mr. Eakins' field-trial pants (Duxbak, $14.95) are of duck, faced with Naugalite, a vinyl plastic made by the U.S. Rubber Co., designed to resist briars. The best hunting shirts are of Viyella, Lanella or 100% wool—Mr. Eakins' is the latter (Pendleton, $13.95). There are many excellent hunting shoes on the market. One of the best is the Russell "Bird Shooter," a genuine moccasin which has a hand-sewn toe piece, rubber composition soles and waterproofed calfskin 10-inch uppers (W. C. Russell, $21). A new one by G. H. Bass & Co., the "Trailmaster," has a double construction: two layers around the vamp with no exposed seams for extra water repellency ($27.50). There is also an excellent new hunting sock on the market, of 91% wool, 9% Helanca—it stretches to fit (Ripon's Glacier Bay sock, $1.50). These or similar clothes will outfit a hunter properly in most of the United States. In the South, however, many hunters wear vests—such as Wood-Stream's Dixie Bird Bag ($10.75)—rather than shooting jackets. As for the western hunter, he prefers Levi's to the conventional brush pants.
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October 10, 1955

How To Be Properly Outfitted In The Field

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There are very good reasons for all of the elements which make up a bird-shooter's outfit, and Arthur R. Eakins (left) of New Hope, Pennsylvania has taken them all into consideration. His shooting jacket and brush pants are forest brown, a color which serves to camouflage the hunter under most field conditions in this country. His hat, however, is scarlet felt (Duxbak, $1.95). Since bird-shooting season overlaps the deer season in some areas, many shotgunners are wearing red for protective reasons, either on hats or on their collars. The jacket (Duxbak, $22.50) is of duck, treated with silicone for additional pliability and water repellency. It has a bi-swing back for shooting freedom and a large, rubberized game pocket zippered into the back which lets down to make a waterproof seat. Mr. Eakins' field-trial pants (Duxbak, $14.95) are of duck, faced with Naugalite, a vinyl plastic made by the U.S. Rubber Co., designed to resist briars. The best hunting shirts are of Viyella, Lanella or 100% wool—Mr. Eakins' is the latter ( Pendleton, $13.95). There are many excellent hunting shoes on the market. One of the best is the Russell "Bird Shooter," a genuine moccasin which has a hand-sewn toe piece, rubber composition soles and waterproofed calfskin 10-inch uppers (W. C. Russell, $21). A new one by G. H. Bass & Co., the "Trailmaster," has a double construction: two layers around the vamp with no exposed seams for extra water repellency ($27.50). There is also an excellent new hunting sock on the market, of 91% wool, 9% Helanca—it stretches to fit ( Ripon's Glacier Bay sock, $1.50). These or similar clothes will outfit a hunter properly in most of the United States. In the South, however, many hunters wear vests—such as Wood-Stream's Dixie Bird Bag ($10.75)—rather than shooting jackets. As for the western hunter, he prefers Levi's to the conventional brush pants.

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