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EVENTS & DISCOVERIES
October 31, 1955
Spoof on a high plane, Tennis market quotations from down under, Far-flung Yankees, Word from an old yachting friend, Fight judge flunks math
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October 31, 1955

Events & Discoveries

Spoof on a high plane, Tennis market quotations from down under, Far-flung Yankees, Word from an old yachting friend, Fight judge flunks math

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RUSSIANS OVER CHICAGO

The best-loved short story in Chicago at the moment has to do with the sightseeing flight of the visiting Soviet housing experts over that city the other day.

As the plane moved up the Lake Michigan shoreline after a look at the giant planned suburb of Park Forest far to the south, the Russians gawked at the sailboats, cruisers and yachts tied up at Jackson Park Harbor, just to the southeast of the University of Chicago.

"Ah," exclaimed I. K. Kozuilia, Russia's minister of city and urban construction and leader of the visiting firemen, "the Chicago fishing fleet!"

"Nope," said the Chicagoan at his elbow. "Yachts of the workers."

TWO IN THE BUSH

Jack Kramer, who says Lewis Hoad and Ken Rosewall had signed an agreement to turn pro (pending their lawyers' approval) when they left the United States, has now discovered that two birds in hand are better than two in the Australian bush.

For, once the young Davis Cup heroes reached home, Kramer was fighting a losing battle—and in the end was routed by vastly superior forces.

The tide began to turn the afternoon-Captain Harry Hopman and Hoad stepped off their big Constellation at Sydney's Mascot Airport proudly bearing the Holy Grail of Australian tennis: the Davis Cup. Joined by teammates Rosewall and Rex Hartwig, who had arrived earlier, they were cheered by hundreds of their countrymen, paraded through the streets of Sydney for the adulation of 50,000 more and given a tumultuous reception presided over by the lord mayor. It was then Kramer might have received his first warning that all was not well with his dreams of a $500,000 world tour. "I hope," a sentiment-choked Hoad told the assembled thousands, "that if we ever lose the Davis Cup again that I might be a member of the team to go over and try to get it back."

This was the signal for the Dunlop Co. (which pays Hoad about $4,500 a year) to begin to talk about job security and advancement; and for Slazengers Proprietary Limited and the Carnation Co. (which will cosponsor Rosewall for nearly $6,000) to speak of a future executive's job. There was also talk about sending the tennis twins on an all-expense-paid tour around the world—as amateurs. "Don't sell yourself cheap," the Australian press told Hoad and Rosewall. Turn down the $50,000 offered now—they were told—win a few more tournaments and then be in a position to command the top price of almost $75,000 Tony Trabert got.

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