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CURRENT WEEK & WHAT'S AHEAD
October 31, 1955
Jack Kramer, disappointed but philosophical over his failure to sign Australia's Lew Hoad and Ken Rosewall to $50,000 pro tennis contracts, went about the business of deciding who would play opposite Tony Trabert on this year's world tour. The top candidates for the three vacant spots: Pancho Gonzales, Pancho Segura, Jack ("I may lack color but I can still hit that ball") Kramer.
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October 31, 1955

Current Week & What's Ahead

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Jack Kramer, disappointed but philosophical over his failure to sign Australia's Lew Hoad and Ken Rosewall to $50,000 pro tennis contracts, went about the business of deciding who would play opposite Tony Trabert on this year's world tour. The top candidates for the three vacant spots: Pancho Gonzales, Pancho Segura, Jack ("I may lack color but I can still hit that ball") Kramer.

Doris Hart, who wasn't offered anything like $50,000, ended her amateur career which included two U.S. singles championships and a triple victory at Wimbledon in 1951, turned pro to teach at Miami Beach's Flamingo Hotel.

Bert Bell, National Football League commissioner, denied again he was worried over Canadian player raids but took a big step to protect the league's interest in this year's crop of college stars just the same: for the first time in history the NFL player draft will be held in November.

Branch Rickey, 73 and unsuccessful at the end of his five-year plan to build the Pittsburgh Pirates into a winner, stepped down as general manager but refused to admit defeat. "I am going to quit punching a clock," he said, "but by no means am I retiring. I'll continue to work for the Pirates until they win a pennant—and that's coming sooner than a lot think."

Career Boy, with a victory in the Garden State Trial, and Needles, who ripped off a sizzling workout the same day, moved up as favorites for Saturday's $300,000 Garden State Stakes. Other strong contenders in the race expected to unscramble the 2-year-old picture: Comedian Lou Costello's Bold Bazooka, which ran well but tired to finish fourth in the trial, and Nail, winner of the Belmont Futurity.

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