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19th HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
October 31, 1955
WE SHORT-SENTENCE BOYS Sirs: You will get a flood of comment on A. Whitney Griswold's verbose article The .Best of Two Worlds (SI, Oct. 17).
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October 31, 1955

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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I am intrigued, however, by the possibility that the pride of the Dalai Lamas may have come from Dogpatch, U.S.A.; surely Al Capp would not dare deceive us with some $150 Manchu darling from Tibet?
JOHN M. RICHARD
Chicago

? Al Capp, challenged by SI to explain this hairy coincidence, delved into his collection of prehistoric cave strips and with pen and brush replied as follows:

Boston, Massachusetts
October 18, 1955
Sirs:
Mr. Richard is, of course, entirely right. Hairless Joe and the Lhasa Apso are brothers under the hair. It happened this way.

At the dawn of. time, one prehistoric hair ball rolled out of a cave, and soon, as was destined, met another prehistoric hairball of the opposite sex.

Soon, there were four hairballs.

The family drifted apart. One line developed first into the now extinct Bearded Herring then, eons later, there appeared on land the bewhiskered monster known as the Tyrannasaurus Gabbihayes which, in modern times, reached its finest flower in Hairless Joe.

Now the other line went this way. It first evolved into the Old English Sheepfish and then, after it became amphibious it developed into the fabled Fullerbrush lizard and then, scarcely eight billion years
later, it turned up in Tibet as the Lhasa Apso (which in Tibetan means "the Hairless Joe Dog.")

I hope this takes the bitterness out of the controversy.

HISTORY IN THE MAKING
Sirs:
The excellent drawing of the memorable Sandy Amoros catch in the seventh game of the 1955 World Series that appears in your October 17th issue must be a permanent display in the Baseball Hall of Fame. Would you do us and baseball this honor?
SID C. KEENER
Director
National Baseball Hall of Fame
Cooperstown, N.Y.

?SI and Artist Robert Riger are glad to contribute this bit of history to the Baseball Hall of Fame. The original drawing, suitably framed, is on its way.—ED.

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