SI Vault
 
CURRENT WEEK & WHAT'S AHEAD
November 14, 1955
College football, after roaring through three fourths of a reasonably sane season, turned topsy-turvy Saturday with some results which did more to distort than focus the bowl-game picture. Contributing most to the confusion: unbeaten Michigan's three-touchdown loss to Illinois. Others: the Georgia Tech and Navy ties, Army's loss to Yale.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
November 14, 1955

Current Week & What's Ahead

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

College football, after roaring through three fourths of a reasonably sane season, turned topsy-turvy Saturday with some results which did more to distort than focus the bowl-game picture. Contributing most to the confusion: unbeaten Michigan's three-touchdown loss to Illinois. Others: the Georgia Tech and Navy ties, Army's loss to Yale.

UCLA, however, and the two Orange Bowl-bound powers, Oklahoma and Maryland, came through. Of the three, UCLA had the most fun. In the College of the Pacific stadium which paraded a streamer pleading "Beat Harvey," Harvey's son Ronnie upheld the Knox honor by scoring one touchdown, passing for another in a 34-0 UCLAn victory.

The big schools did not make all the news. Down in Danville, Kentucky, little Centre College won again, headed toward its first undefeated season since Uncle Charley Moran's Praying Colonels, led by a young quarterback named Bo McMillin, beat proud Harvard in 1921.

Jack McGrath, veteran Los Angeles driver who held the Indianapolis one-lap record, brought the American Automobile Association's race sponsorship to a tragic end when he died in a crack-up during a race at Phoenix. It was doubly ironical: the AAA was withdrawing sponsorship because of just such disasters; McGrath had said this was to be his last race on dirt tracks.

Jackie Robinson, nearing the end of a fabulous playing career with the Brooklyn Dodgers, turned an attentive ear west toward Vancouver, where the Pacific Coast League's newest member is looking for a manager. It was only a rumor that organized baseball's first Negro player might also become its first Negro manager, but "I am certainly interested," said Jackie, "in listening to an offer."

1