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19th HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
November 14, 1955
COACH, FATHER AND MAN Sirs:Enjoyed CONVERSATION PIECE: SUBJECT: Frank Leahy in the Oct. 31 issue. It was really a true picture of Leahy, the coach, father and man. I have only met him personally once, but I have observed him coaching at Notre Dame practices many times.
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November 14, 1955

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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THIS VERSATILE LANGUAGE
Sirs:
Thanks for the pleasant and sympathetic introduction you published with Pot I of "Violate Huskings" (SI, Oct. 24). Whoever wrote it has a light touch and a sprightly wit which amused me vastly and pleased me, too, as I haven't always fared so well at the hands of commentators on the Anguish Languish.

The Anguish Languish consists only of the purest of English words, and its chief raison d'�tre is to demonstrate the marvelous versatility of a language in which almost anything can, if necessary, be made to mean something else.

Your writer's use of the word frammis sent me and other word-happy profs
scurrying for the larger dictionaries. We've decided that frammis exists only in SI's private lexicon, or perhaps in Finnegans Wake. If we're wrong about this, could you please let us know? Delesseriaceous undoubtedly is there too. This juicily sibilant creation is admittedly more delicious-sounding than my deletitious.
HOWARD L. CHACE
Oxford, Ohio

?Scholars of the contemporary scene consider frammis, the basic nonsense word in doubletalk, synonymous with any off-beat language. What came before frammis? Herris-Gerris, of course, which itself had as an ancestor Jabberwocky, the classic of doubletalk. Delesseriaceous, a pure English word much appreciated by conductors of spelling bees, describes the common red algae of the North Atlantic seaboard.—ED.

STYLE FOR THE TACK ROOM
Sirs:
I must congratulate you on the arresting and in all ways beguiling horse show cover for your October 31st issue.

It embodies, to me, the three principal elements of a good cover. Style—instant attraction of one's eye—and a most charming subject. I am sure it will be removed from the magazine and hung in many a tack room.

Such a handsome arrangement of black and white, yet full of color.
JAMES REYNOLDS
New York

?Mr. Reynolds is one of Ireland's most prolific producers of books and paintings on horses, as well as the author of some fine Irish ghost stories.—ED.

HORSEMEN EVERYWHERE
Sirs:
CONGRATULATIONS AND THANKS FOR YOUR INTELLIGENT PREVIEW OP THE NATIONAL HORSE SHOW AND YOUR PREVIOUS COVERAGE OF HORSE EVENTS. I AM SURE THAT HORSEMEN AND HORSEWOMEN EVERYWHERE SHARE MY RESPECT FOR YOUR RECOGNITION OF HORSEMANSHIP AS A SPORTING AND EXACTING FORM OF ATHLETICS.
PAT HUMPHRIES
Fresno, Calif.

THE MEN WHO KNOW
Sirs:
I can almost say, "Glory, Hallelujah!" for Here Comes Hockey (SI, Oct. 24). At last has come an American publication which in a concise and, in my opinion, accurate way has placed the picture of the National Hockey League for the 1955-56 season before the public.

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