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CURRENT WEEK & WHAT'S AHEAD
November 21, 1955
While Oklahoma and TCU marched jauntily toward bowl dates, some others had trouble. West Virginia, for one, which fell from the unbeaten ranks by losing to Pittsburgh 26-7. Maryland, for another, which had to overcome a two-touchdown deficit to beat Clemson 25-12. And UCLA, which needed a field goal in the last 18 seconds to shade Washington 19-17 and lost star Tailback Ronnie Knox in the process. But the broken bone in Knox's right leg could be worse: "He'll be ready for the Rose Bowl," said the UCLA doctor.
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November 21, 1955

Current Week & What's Ahead

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While Oklahoma and TCU marched jauntily toward bowl dates, some others had trouble. West Virginia, for one, which fell from the unbeaten ranks by losing to Pittsburgh 26-7. Maryland, for another, which had to overcome a two-touchdown deficit to beat Clemson 25-12. And UCLA, which needed a field goal in the last 18 seconds to shade Washington 19-17 and lost star Tailback Ronnie Knox in the process. But the broken bone in Knox's right leg could be worse: "He'll be ready for the Rose Bowl," said the UCLA doctor.

Jack Kramer, worried about his own ability to go full speed on the forthcoming world professional tennis tour, withdrew from the playing cast and hired another old pro: Richard (Pancho) Gonzales. The final lineup, after some juggling worthy of Casey Stengel, will open in New York's Madison Square Garden Dec. 12 with Gonzales playing Tony Trabert in the feature match.

El Chama and Prendase, a pair of stretch-running neighbors from Venezuela, continued a private duel of their own in the Laurel International. They finished one-two in the $65,000 invitational affair while horses from Ireland, England, France, Germany, Canada and the U.S. trailed along behind.

Leo Durocher put an end to conjecture he might return to baseball next year. Contacted by phone about a Pacific Coast League managerial vacancy at Seattle, Leo brought his caller up short: "You know that room you're standing in right now?" he asked. "Well, it won't hold enough money to get me back in baseball."

Arnold Jonnson, who brought big league baseball to Kansas City, may entice pro football there as well. Although the Chicago Cardinals deny they will sell their NFL franchise, Johnson has been told the deal might be worked out—and he's interested in trying once the season is over.

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