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19th HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
December 05, 1955
YOU CAN'T STOCKPILE DEER Sirs:My congratulations on your progressive deer management article To Save the Herd: Shoot More Deer (SI, Nov. 21). If game and fish departments are ever relieved from political influences and uninformed "pressures," then they may be able to start fulfilling their true purpose. That goal should be to provide as much hunting and fishing as is humanly possible without hurting the basic breeding stocks.
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December 05, 1955

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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MY SPORTSMAN IS...
Sirs:
As a reader of SI my Sportsman of the Year is a woman: Jill Kinmont, one of the country's best skiers and one who has inspired thousands of us with her brave and cheerful fight against total paralysis. She has skill, spirit and fortitude. What more can we ask of our Sportsman?
G. A. ROSCOE
Boston

THIS INSPIRING LEADER
Sirs:
There can only be one choice for SI's Sportsman of '56. The man who led the greatest baseball team of decades to a long-sought league victory and then climaxed this by the most thrilling world series in recent times. I refer, of course, to Walter Alston, the modest, capable, inspiring leader of the Brooklyn Dodgers. I think Alston can stand beside Roger Bannister.
DAVID HOWLAND
South Londonderry, Vt.

HOW I HEARD IT
Sirs:
Regarding Arthur W. Calver's letter (19TH HOLE, NOV. 14), the way I heard the story, the telegram really went like this: BRUISES HURT ERASED AFFORD ERECTED ANALYSIS HURT TOO INFECTIOUS DEBT.
AUDREY MAGEE
Trenton, N.J.

ONE FOR THE RACE
Sirs:
I was very impressed by Ylla's pictures of an Indian village fair (SI, Nov. 14). They were a striking portrayal of North Indian villagers and their love of color and group entertainments. This is an aspect of Indian life which we Americans rarely hear about, being absorbed as we are with the idea that India is either a land of problems or of pageantry solely on the princely level. You have presented an outstanding example of another aspect of the lives of these hardworking farmers.

I thought you might be interested in the following sidelight on bullock-cart races. Last year, when in India, I visited a village in Bombay State (which is legally dry) and was told of an apparently common practice among the villagers in that area when they hold such races. In order to enliven the proceedings, they will often prepare their bullocks in advance by dosing them with potent amounts of homemade bootleg liquor. The results are considerable and the race is a good deal less dull than a 10-mph speed would lead us to expect.

Unfortunately, I never was able to find out how a bullock feels with a hangover.
DURONDA R. KOENIG
Miami

BETWEEN US BABOONS
Sirs:
Can you send me further information on the Colonel Hilsman duck-calling phonograph? You say (E & D, Nov. 7): "...a duck hunter is the craziest baboon in the world. If it costs $85 to have a duck on his lap he'll spend it in a minute." My husband and I are such baboons and we want it.
MRS. ALBERT W. WALKER
Washington, D.C.

?Both records ($2.50) and phonographs ($84.50) may be obtained from the Roger Hilsman Company, 3270 Lyon Street, San Francisco 23.—ED.

SUCH A SMALL COUNTRY
Sirs:
I have just had the pleasure of reading Hungary Becomes a Great Power—in Track, by David Mayer (SI, Nov. 21). I was happy to see that you have given some long-overdue recognition to Hungary as a power in the world of sports. It is certain that for such a small country (pop. 7 million) to amass such a phenomenal record both in the Olympics (third in '48 and '52) and other international sports competitions (soccer, swimming and now track) is a remarkable and highly praiseworthy achievement.

I was saddened, however, by the fact that SI and Mr. Mayer steadfastly insist upon drawing a line between the athletes of East and West. If the Soviet Union wishes to use sports as a battleground for political ideology, the United States need not stoop to do likewise. I am sure that

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