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EVENTS & DISCOVERIES
December 19, 1955
MR. HELFAND LOWERS THE BOOM, MANNERS OF THE CROWD—TENNIS, FAREWELL TO HONUS, NEW ADDICTION IS THREAT TO OUTDOORSMEN, A WORD TO IKE ON CROWS, BOXER PUNCHES WAY THROUGH CURTAIN
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December 19, 1955

Events & Discoveries

MR. HELFAND LOWERS THE BOOM, MANNERS OF THE CROWD—TENNIS, FAREWELL TO HONUS, NEW ADDICTION IS THREAT TO OUTDOORSMEN, A WORD TO IKE ON CROWS, BOXER PUNCHES WAY THROUGH CURTAIN

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BOXING'S DIRTY BUSINESS

Action in New York

The international Boxing Guild is a kind of managers' syndicate which set itself up a little over three years ago with the intent, as Jack (Doc) Kearns put it, to run boxing without interference from the likes of state athletic commissions. And, with local chapters in principal boxing centers, the Guild very quickly did come to dominate the sport, at least in matters outside the purview of Frank Carbo, boxing's underworld boss. It grew so powerful that the International Boxing Club ( James D. Norris, president) confessed itself helpless to get fights for those who, like Vince Martinez, the grounded welterweight (SI, May 30), had incurred the Guild's disfavor.

Since last May, Julius Helfand, onetime racket buster and tyro boxing commissioner in New York, has been taking a long, hard look at the Guild. On Monday he handed down a decision:

After next January 15 anyone who belongs to the Guild's New York affiliate, the Boxing Guild of New York, will have his license revoked or suspended "upon the ground that such membership is an act and conduct detrimental to the interests of boxing generally and to the public interest, convenience and necessity." The International Guild is outside his jurisdiction, Helfand explained, but a copy of the ruling will go to other state athletic commissions.

"I hope," he said, "that the states will honor the ruling of this commission." When a manager is suspended in one state it is customary for other states to refuse him a license, too. And it is quite possible that other states will now take a good look at their local Guild chapters. A federal grand jury is doing so in Cleveland.

In handing down the ruling, Helfand reviewed what his investigation had turned up in seven months of arduous questioning of reluctant Guild officials, some of whom flatly refused to testify and shrugged off loss of their licenses. The Guild, he said, had "arrogated to itself the conduct and regulation of boxing in New York" (just as Jack Kearns had said it would) and, if permitted to continue, would "reduce the commission to an empty shell subservient to the whim, caprice and dictates of the Guild."

Though managers may not associate with known criminals, they have done so, Helfand said.

"Here the sinister and shadowy figure of the notorious Frankie Carbo emerged," he related. "Perhaps one of the most elusive personalities in the field of boxing, Carbo has an extensive criminal record. A number of Guild managers admitted under oath long association with Carbo, but denied that they knew what his business was or even where he could be found.... It is significant and worthy of comment that these very managers who admitted intimate friendship with Carbo, kept no records of their finances, no bank accounts and did business strictly on a cash basis."

The Guild was "underhanded and dishonest," he charged, in taking $17,000 from Ray Arcel, a promoter, assertedly for advertising in a conveniently created magazine but actually as a payoff for "cooperation" in supplying Arcel with fighters. The device, Helfand said, was a "sham." No one could be found who knew what happened to the $17,000, paid in cash, after Honest Bill Daly, Guild treasurer and manager of Martinez, deposited it in a New Jersey bank.

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