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EVENTS & DISCOVERIES
December 26, 1955
SPORT'S MERRY FLAME ON THE YULE LOG, TCU'S VERY IMPORTANT ANKLE, A THOUGHT ON SOCCER FOR SPRING, PENGUINS ARE SO PECULIAR, HUZZAHS FOR JULIE HELFAND, SOME SPORTING PRINCE
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December 26, 1955

Events & Discoveries

SPORT'S MERRY FLAME ON THE YULE LOG, TCU'S VERY IMPORTANT ANKLE, A THOUGHT ON SOCCER FOR SPRING, PENGUINS ARE SO PECULIAR, HUZZAHS FOR JULIE HELFAND, SOME SPORTING PRINCE

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Also in St. Louis, Walter Giesler, a former president of the United States Soccer Football Association, agreed with McSkimming and added: "The time for taking action is better now than ever because of the growing sentiment against spring football practice."

Two of soccer's most dedicated evangelists, Glenn F. H. Warner, coach of Navy, and Carleton Reilly, coach of Brooklyn College, were in mild disagreement. Warner said soccer could never be forced into Navy's crowded spring schedule of athletics. Reilly would like to see soccer a spring game—and a fall and winter game, too.

So, with opinion about evenly divided in this sampling, the spring soccer issue is offered to the forum at St. Petersburg for some booting around.

PENGUINS AND GOLFERS

At the annual banquet of the National Audubon Society, diners saw a very entertaining movie about penguins, made by Olin Pettingill in the Falkland Islands. An enthralled Audubonian told a friend about it and said he was most impressed by the fact that for hundreds of years Falkland Island penguins have come ashore a good two miles from their traditional nesting grounds, then waddled clumsily and painfully across a stretch of rough, brushy country to reach the hatchery. It impressed him, he explained, because the nesting grounds were actually only a few hundred feet from the sea—but the birds, victims of instinct, followed the same trail laid down ages ago when the islands were probably quite different in topography, and on leaving the nesting area to return to the water they retraced the same laborious two miles instead of simply toddling a few yards into the South Atlantic Ocean.

"Doesn't impress me a bit," his friend said. "I've watched thousands of men standing at the first tee at the country club, less than 200 feet from the bar—and to get there they tramped around an 18-hole golf course."

HELFAND: FRIENDS AND FOES

The pronunciamento of Julius Helfand which outlawed the Boxing Guild of New York (SI, Dec. 19) reverberated in other states last week. With almost every reverberation, echo answered "Yes."

The New York boxing commission chairman heard votes of confidence from Wisconsin, Minnesota, Pennsylvania and Maryland. Fred Saddy, secretary of the Wisconsin State Athletic Commission, said he would recommend that the executive committee of the National Boxing Association, made up of commission members from most states, put the NBA behind Helfand in his stand. This would give national stature to Helfand's order, limited by law to New York but aimed in effect at the International Boxing Guild, of which the New York Guild is but a chapter. There were assurances of support, too, from Jim Crowley, chairman of the Pennsylvania commission, George Barton, former NBA president and chairman of the Minnesota commission, and J. Marshall Boone, Maryland chairman.

Boone, chairman of the legislative committee of the NBA, wired Helfand that "all states that have signed agreements with the New York State Athletic Commission must stand up and be counted." States with such agreements are Maryland, Missouri, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Michigan and Illinois. The agreements provide for cooperation in respecting each other's suspensions. Massachusetts promised to recognize any Helfand suspensions. Michigan indicated it would do the same.

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