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A WARNING ON THE SCHUSS: IT'S NOT FOR BEGINNERS—AND EXPERTS SHOULD LEARN TO USE EDGES TO KEEP THEIR SKIS FROM WANDERING
Friedl Pfeifer/Coach, U.S. Olympic Team
December 26, 1955
The straight downhill run, or schuss, is one of the greatest thrills of skiing. But schussing requires a much higher degree of skill than the beginner possesses, and it should be avoided by him unless he is taking instruction.
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December 26, 1955

A Warning On The Schuss: It's Not For Beginners—and Experts Should Learn To Use Edges To Keep Their Skis From Wandering

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The straight downhill run, or schuss, is one of the greatest thrills of skiing. But schussing requires a much higher degree of skill than the beginner possesses, and it should be avoided by him unless he is taking instruction.

Once a skier is ready to schuss, he will often find his skis wandering in different directions in the middle of the run. Even experts have this problem. To solve it, the two skis, regardless of the speed of the schuss, must be made to do the same thing at the same time. If they don't, don't blame the skis. It's your fault.

First and most important, your weight must be equally divided on both skis at all times. Secondly, the edges must be used. That is, a very slight pressure, coming only from the ankles, with no body lean, should be exerted on the inside edge of one ski and outside edge of the other. If you edge evenly, the two skis will feel as though they were one. Too much pressure, however, will cause you to catch an edge, making the ski swerve violently and usually leading to a nasty fall.

Only practice—starting slowly and gradually increasing speed—will tell you how much pressure on the edges may be safely used. Remember, your weight must be over both skies equally. One last warning: never schuss so fast that you are out of control. Always know that you can stop anywhere by using a Christy, or, if your Christy isn't good enough, start on a small slope with a flat run-out at the bottom.

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