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CURRENT WEEK & WHAT'S AHEAD
May 07, 1956
Don't expect Nashua and Swaps to meet again in the proposed $200,000 match race on the West Coast. There is, however, a very strong possibility that the two great Thoroughbreds will wind up on the same Kentucky stud farm, if Ellsworth & Co. decide to cash in on their champion's breeding promise.
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May 07, 1956

Current Week & What's Ahead

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Don't expect Nashua and Swaps to meet again in the proposed $200,000 match race on the West Coast. There is, however, a very strong possibility that the two great Thoroughbreds will wind up on the same Kentucky stud farm, if Ellsworth & Co. decide to cash in on their champion's breeding promise.

Harvey Kuenn, Detroit's 25-year-old slugging shortstop, learned from his wife that his draft board wanted to see him on May 11. Later, Casey Stengel was asked if Kuenn's absence would hurt the Tigers. "The Tigers might be hurt," said the Yankee manager, "but the pitching all over the league will improve."

John Landy, Australia's and the world's supreme miler, sounded unduly pessimistic as he left Australia for his U.S. debut on May 5 in California, where he will be paced by Lon Spurrier, world record holder in the 880. "The true potential of any athlete never is fully realized," he observed. "I know that I am 20 yards better in time than when I created the world record [3 min. 58 sec.]. Despite this, I cannot get that time on the board."

Australia's Olympic officials were meanwhile gloating over an advance sale of 60,000 tickets, of which 45,000 were orders from schools whose pupils will attend in huge blocs. Nearly all lower-priced seats have been sold for November 28, the sixth day of the Games, when Landy, the national idol, will probably appear in the 5,000 meter race.

Oregon's Supreme Court ruled that a baseball fan must assume the risk of being hit by a foul ball. In an historic obiter dictum, the justices pointed out—while setting aside a judgment of $2,400 for William Hunt-that the plaintiff could have ducked out of the way if he had been paying attention to the game at the Portland Beavers' ball park.

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