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LEADFOOT AND LIGHTFOOT
Coles Phinizy
April 02, 1956
An Indy champion and the world's top Grand Prix driver are Sebring's heroes
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April 02, 1956

Leadfoot And Lightfoot

An Indy champion and the world's top Grand Prix driver are Sebring's heroes

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For the last hour the night air was filled with the splatting of backfire as drivers de-accelerated 200 and 300 yards from the curves to save what little brakes they might have. Only 24 cars finished the 12 hours. The Sweikert-Ensley Jaguar came in third, behind the two factory Ferraris; John Fitch's Chevrolet Corvette, after a steady, well-driven race, came in a creditable ninth. The winners, Fangio and Castellotti, averaged 84 mph in setting a new record of 1,008.8 miles. "My only worry was the brakes," said Fangio. "We were trying to burn the Jaguars up, and we succeeded, no?"

He had indeed, with one exception. The Sweikert-Ensley D-Jaguar had enough brakes left for 12 hours more. After the race was over, Bob Sweikert sought out Fangio, and the two had a long conversation. The gist of it: an invitation from Fangio to Sweikert to come to Europe for some more sports car races this summer; an invitation from Sweikert to Fangio to come to Indianapolis and drive a Sweikert-entered D-A Lubricant Special. Light-foot Fangio and Leadfoot Sweikert both agreed to think it over.

[This article contains a table. Please see hardcopy of magazine or PDF.]

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