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CURRENT WEEK & WHAT'S AHEAD
January 30, 1956
President Eisenhower, kept from his favorite putting and chipping green by a blanket of snow, has turned to swimming as a new form of exercise at the suggestion of his physicians. Each day, shortly before lunch, Ike walks over to the 15-by-50-foot White House pool, ducks into the tepid 86� water and porpoises around for 30 or 40 minutes under the watchful eye of Dr. Howard McC. Snyder.
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January 30, 1956

Current Week & What's Ahead

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President Eisenhower, kept from his favorite putting and chipping green by a blanket of snow, has turned to swimming as a new form of exercise at the suggestion of his physicians. Each day, shortly before lunch, Ike walks over to the 15-by-50-foot White House pool, ducks into the tepid 86� water and porpoises around for 30 or 40 minutes under the watchful eye of Dr. Howard McC. Snyder.

Kentucky's intrepid Adolph Rupp brushed off early-season defeats by Temple and Dayton and put in his claim for the NCAA basketball championship. Admitting that unbeaten San Francisco will be in the finals March 22, Rupp says: "That's when we have our date with them. And I know what to do with them right now."

American track fans got disappointing news when Britain's Brian Hewson, one of five who have run the mile in less than four minutes, regretfully notified the AAU that he won't be able to compete in the U.S. next month because of a strained leg muscle, though he may possibly arrive for the wind-up of the indoor season in March. But balancing the disappointment of mile fanciers was the discovery of the new sprint sensation, Dave Sime of Duke (see above).

Russia, even more serious about the Melbourne Olympics than about Cortina, is planning the biggest tryouts ever held by one country. According to Constantin Andreanov, Soviet Olympic chairman, millions of Russians will take part in a three-month-long series of meets with some 10,000 survivors competing in the finals—a two-week "Spartakiade" in a new 100,000-seat stadium in Moscow next August.

East Germany has unfrocked five athletes who fled to the West, taking away their title Master of Sports because "through their behavior they have damaged the reputation of the democratic sport movement."

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