SI Vault
 
Especially for weekend golfers
Ray Gafford
January 30, 1956
In this age of soft, heavily watered greens, the lofted approach with the nine-iron or wedge has become standard for most golfers, and many automatically play this type of shot even when the situation calls for the old run-up method, the chip and run. Many more golfers should know how to play the chip-and-run short approach than now do, for a golfer can really obtain more control by running the ball up toward the hole than by attempting to drop it in the hole.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
January 30, 1956

Especially For Weekend Golfers

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

In this age of soft, heavily watered greens, the lofted approach with the nine-iron or wedge has become standard for most golfers, and many automatically play this type of shot even when the situation calls for the old run-up method, the chip and run. Many more golfers should know how to play the chip-and-run short approach than now do, for a golfer can really obtain more control by running the ball up toward the hole than by attempting to drop it in the hole.

The chip-and-run shot is played with any iron from the four through the nine, the club selected depending on the lie of the land. For all clubs, the technique is exactly the same. The club face is square to the line at address, with the hands slightly ahead of the ball. The club strikes the ball a descending blow. There should be only a minimum of wrist action when the player takes the club back, and on the forward part of the stroke there should be no wrist action at all.

The idea, of course, is to pitch the ball a short distance in the air and to let it roll the rest of the way to the hole. The player learns how to gauge the length of the shot by practice and by carefully observing how the ball performs. A good shot is one that is played the right distance.

from RAY GAFFORD, Ridglea Country Club, Fort Worth

1