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19th HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
January 30, 1956
BASKETBALL AND COUSY Sirs: My congratulations to SI and to your Herbert Warren Wind for his superb series on Bob Cousy. Mr. Wind's golf coverage, particularly his lengthy account of the Masters tournament last spring, was the best I have ever read anywhere. I was pleasantly surprised to find him a basketball expert, too, writing with as much knowledge and insight on basketball as he does on golf. His job on Cousy, indeed, was also a history of the evolution of basketball, and I thought was written with unusual care. As to Cousy, he is to basketball what Babe Ruth, Feller, DiMaggio and Williams have been to baseball. Surprisingly, too many sportswriters still regard basketball as a minor sport, and Cousy is not nearly as well known (particularly here in the Midwest and in Chicago where we are without a professional team) as he deserves to be. JERRY HOLTZMAN Chicago
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January 30, 1956

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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BASKETBALL AND COUSY
Sirs:
My congratulations to SI and to your Herbert Warren Wind for his superb series on Bob Cousy. Mr. Wind's golf coverage, particularly his lengthy account of the Masters tournament last spring, was the best I have ever read anywhere. I was pleasantly surprised to find him a basketball expert, too, writing with as much knowledge and insight on basketball as he does on golf. His job on Cousy, indeed, was also a history of the evolution of basketball, and I thought was written with unusual care. As to Cousy, he is to basketball what Babe Ruth, Feller, DiMaggio and Williams have been to baseball. Surprisingly, too many sportswriters still regard basketball as a minor sport, and Cousy is not nearly as well known (particularly here in the Midwest and in Chicago where we are without a professional team) as he deserves to be.
JERRY HOLTZMAN
Chicago

•Although Herb Wind is best known for his golf reporting, he has been writing on sports in general for the past 20-odd years. Herb grew up in Brockton, Massachusetts, a basketball hotbed where high school teams are famous for their records and backyard courts as ubiquitous as in Indiana. He was a member of the '35 and '36 Yale teams and has played the game in such unlikely places as South America and China.—ED.

WONDERFUL MAN
Sirs:
I have just finished your article on Bob Cousy and must say this story is exceptional even for your high standards. I had never realized what a wonderful man Bob is, on and off the court.

I think SI is growing better every issue.
ROBERT BOGARD
Omaha

WHERE WAS THE 29TH?
Sirs:
I have just finished the second of your articles on the number two basketball player in the game today.

There are 28 great names mentioned, including the "Original Celtics," but I have yet to run across the name of the greatest of them all, Tom Gola.

I hope that Mr. Wind realizes that in five seasons the Celtics have had mediocre seasons led by Bob Cousy, and in just one half of a season Tom Gola is leading his team to a championship.
BILL HIGGINS
Philadelphia

•It was not SI's intention to mention in the Cousy articles every player, coach and official who has contributed to the growth and development of basketball. Many more, of course, would necessarily be included in any truly comprehensive study; to name just one: Frank Keany, the coach of Rhode Island State and the chief of fire-engine basketball. SI may even have failed to elaborate on the contributions of some mentioned in the articles. For instance, the imaginative style of basketball played by Cousy and his teammates at Holy Cross was testimony to Coach Doggie Julian's ability to recognize that his talented squad would be far better off if not chained to restricting formal, patterns. Julian, to be sure, is a progressive coach and deserves considerable credit for recognizing Cousy's great instinctive abilities and aiding their development.—ED.

A PROPOSAL AND A THOUGHT
Sirs:
Here is a rather unorthodox suggestion for overcoming the excess height problem in basketball. How about placing a restriction on the total number of inches of players any team could have in a game at one time. Thus, if it were agreed upon that the average height of players should not exceed 6 feet 3 inches (75 inches), then a team would be permitted five times this figure, or 375 total inches of players at one time. Then if a team such as Kansas with Wilt Chamberlain (7 feet 2 inches) wished to play its giant, it would have to limit the height of the other players in the game to allow for the larger man. In Chamberlain's case, he being 86 inches tall, his teammates would be left with 289 inches to divide among themselves (an average of a little over 6 feet per man). This would actually not be difficult to administer. I might add that it is just as unfair to ask a 6-foot 5-inch man to contend with a seven-footer as it is to ask a light-weight to box a heavyweight.

In Jan. 16 19TH HOLE, Allison Cook, of Tallahassee, Florida, decries SI's integration of sociology with sports. It would seem to me that the two are interwoven in essence. Is not the intermingling of the French and English speaking people at the Montreal Forum on Saturday nights just as much a part of the glamour of Les Canadiens as is the play of Richard & Co.? Can the same not be said about the spectacle of seeing an entire town turning out to watch the local high school team do battle? Wouldn't Montreal hockey and high school basketball be much less appealing to real sporting fans if the sociology were not there to go along with the sport?
GERRY BRANDMEYER
Champaign, Ill.

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