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The Question: Would you permit your husband or wife to take a pleasure cruise alone?
Jimmy Jemail
January 16, 1956
LUBA MALINAComedienne New York "No, sir. A cruise in balmy waters is almost unreal, particularly if a husband hasn't taken one alone. His pleasure cruises must be with me. They'd be real. He wouldn't get into trouble. I've got a great guy and I'll never get another like him. I want to feast my eyes on him all the time."
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January 16, 1956

The Question: Would You Permit Your Husband Or Wife To Take A Pleasure Cruise Alone?

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LUBA MALINA
Comedienne
New York
"No, sir. A cruise in balmy waters is almost unreal, particularly if a husband hasn't taken one alone. His pleasure cruises must be with me. They'd be real. He wouldn't get into trouble. I've got a great guy and I'll never get another like him. I want to feast my eyes on him all the time."

FRED O. RUSSELL
Branch sales manager
Louisville, Ky.
"Yes. I trust my wife. If a husband isn't suspicious, he won't object to an occasional separation in which his wife will have a good time. A man who loves his wife wants her to have a good time. Would she let me take a cruise alone? My son doesn't think so, and I think he's right."

MRS. EDWARD SULZBERGER
Housewife
New York
"Absolutely not! After all, I married him for better or worse. He'd better not take a pleasure cruise alone! Don't I trust him? I certainly do. But how about the lone women who take these cruises? Are they going on the advice of their doctors, for their health? Don't make me laugh."

RALPH E. CONRAD
Retired
Oakland, Calif.
"Yes, I'd let my wife go. There's so much opportunity for fun in the world; too bad we don't enjoy it. Many of my friends have died working for money which brings them no pleasure. I'd like my wife to have as good a time as the other lone women on a cruise—I go away to hunt and fish."

MRS. EMILY H. SLORP
Housewife
Cleveland, Ohio
"About 10 years ago, I'd have been reluctant. I'm reminded of Chief Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes' remark, 'Oh, to be 60 again,' when a sweet young thing gave him a devastating smile. But 10 years does make a difference. People tend to become more tolerant with the years."

MRS. ORMOND V. GOULD
Housewife
Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
"It depends on his definition of the word 'pleasure.' And whether or not a husband is 70 or over. My husband isn't 70, but I'd let him go. Unlike most men, a pleasure cruise for him is rest and relaxation. He knows this isn't a back-handed compliment. We understand each other perfectly."

MRS. NINA RAO CAMERON
Immigration lawyer
New York
"No. It's not that I don't trust my husband. I do. But there are so many scheming women on cruises. Some go alone or they go in pairs. The men want to mind their own business, but these women won't let them. Lots of them go on cruises to hook a man. And a man is a man."

MRS. W. L. RICHARDS
Housewife
Lafayette, Col.
"Certainly. Often after a separation a husband and wife appreciate each other more. That is, if their home ties are strong enough. A smart wife never holds too tight a rein. Policing a husband is one sure way of losing him. Anyway, a fling can get tiresome, too. It isn't a lasting thing."

PAUL O. GRISCHY
Attorney
Cincinnati, Ohio
"Yes, if she can afford it. Why not? A cruise is a wonderful experience. I'm positive she wouldn't be lonesome a minute. Not with her charm and personality. Me? I couldn't afford to take a cruise alone. Not because of the money; but when I get home I might talk in my sleep."

MRS. PEGGY ROESCHLE
Widow
San Mateo, Calif.
"No. Girls, if you want your husband back, don't let him go. There are many widows on these ships. They have a grand time. I'm one of them. If I met a discontented husband and wanted him, I'd get him. But a happily married man, no. I wouldn't want another woman to do that to me."

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