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19th HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
December 17, 1956
HOT STOVE: FEET FIRST Sirs:Your Hot Stove League program is the best thing since the Sox got Nellie Fox for Joe Tipton. It is really good to be able to read about trades, even if they are dreams, or unworkable, or even illogical at times. Being a rabid living-room league-shuffler, I have to jump in feet first.
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December 17, 1956

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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HOT STOVE: AMPUTATION
Sirs:
Messrs. Saperstein and Mayer in their so-called trades included Ken Boyer. They must be kidding. I believe Mr. Lane would rather part with his left arm.
TOM ROLF
St. Louis

HOT STOVE: MEAT AND POTATOES
Sirs:
I wish to advise Mr. Saperstein that this Pirate fan would not trade Messrs. Virdon and Friend for the whole 1956 Dodger team. These two boys are our meat and potatoes, and after such a long famine here in Pittsburgh, we will not be likely to give up two staple products for a few quick-energy articles from which the vitamin loss is becoming noticeable.
MARTHA TUNSTALL
Pittsburgh

HOT STOVE: SEE IT NOW
Sirs:
Before reading the elaborate trade intentions of Messrs. Saperstein and Mayer, I thought myself a rare bird indeed while drawing up my own large-scale deals involving the Dodgers. But since this trade craze appears to be a defense mechanism in general use by Flatbush fans to help us forget what usually happens every October, who am I to fight a trend? See if this player scheme doesn't top everything you have heard to date.

Hodges, Furillo, Craig and Robinson to the Giants for Mays and Spencer; Campanella, Gilliam, Zimmer, Lehman and Jackson to the Pirates for Friend and Thomas; Erskine, Thomas, Spencer and Amoros to the Braves for Mathews.

The awesome Dodger lineup would read like this: Fernandez, ss; Neal, 2b; Snider, cf; Mays, rf; Mathews, 3b; Demeter, If; Gentile, 1b; Rosboro, c.
FRANK CREIGHTON
Fort Polk, La.

HOT STOVE: ASTOUNDING TRADES
Sirs:
I am about to join the growing list of self-appointed general managers.

Here are my astounding trades. The Pirates need a catcher and the Phillies need infielders, so trade Dick Groat, Bob Skinner, Spook Jacobs and Jack Shepard to the Phils for Stan Lopata. The Pirates get a good catcher while the Phils get a good shortstop, a first baseman with great potential (even toward the close of the season Bragan still said Skinner was his best hitter but he couldn't find a place to play him as his fielding didn't compare with Long's), another infielder and a fair catcher. As the Phillies have more than once expressed vivid interest in Groat and Skinner, it's possible they might have to include another player, as, for example, Granny Hamner. If this fell through, it's possible the Red-legs' interest in pitching could lead to a Vern Law for Smokey Burgess and Hal Jeff coat deal.

Most will agree I have been general manager too long. So now, under pressure, I resign. Though I have probably created dissatisfaction in many areas, my own particular wigwam is heated to satisfaction.
PHILIP G. LEE
Owego, N.Y.

TRACK: A WISE MAN'S VALUES
Sirs:
Thanks for your article on track coach Stampfl (SI, Nov. 26). It comes as a pleasant surprise to read of such a truly wise man. So much has been sentimentally spoken and vaguely written about the value of sports in character building (in the face of much evidence to the contrary) that it is amazing that this one article can make it again seem plausible.

Stampfl's formula appears to be simple, honest and direct rather than "mysterious," as described in your title, and I believe it applies to much of life's race other than track events: be genuinely interested in the person, encourage him to set high goals for himself, show him the way, insist that he accept his own responsibility and watch him go! How better to rear children? How better to develop business subordinates? How could schools follow a better policy?

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