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HICKMAN'S ANALYSIS
Don Parker
December 10, 1956
Navy's offensive effort was a definite disappointment. Usually they are flanker-conscious, pass-minded, imaginative and explosive. Their pinpoint passing was never blended into the stuttering and sometimes nonexistent running attack. Navy had many opportunities to cash in on Army fumbles and miscues but capitalized only once for a touchdown.
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December 10, 1956

Hickman's Analysis

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Navy's offensive effort was a definite disappointment. Usually they are flanker-conscious, pass-minded, imaginative and explosive. Their pinpoint passing was never blended into the stuttering and sometimes nonexistent running attack. Navy had many opportunities to cash in on Army fumbles and miscues but capitalized only once for a touchdown.

Army's attack was more open. Their passing, not impressive statistically, was used strategically to good advantage. The jump pass, diagrammed here last week with the football manikins, was effective, and the "fake-quick-jump-and-throw-deep" was beautifully executed and just missed by a hair. The overhand quick pitchout thrown to a set halfback, made famous by Glen Davis but used infrequently nowadays, was refreshing. This yardage was classed under rushing. The "ride series," especially with Fullback Bob Kyasky carrying, seemed more deceptive than ever and gained huge chunks of yardage, only to be partially nullified by persistent fumbling.

Kyasky, playing his final game for Army, proved himself the best runner on the field. Whether his 22-yard run from deep punt formation with 4th down and three to go from mid-field was planned or not, I don't know, but it certainly was well executed. In fact, it looked too good to be planned. Two Navy sophomores were outstanding performers, Mr. Big and Mr. Small. I watched Mr. Big, Bob Reifsnyder, closely on defense and predict that he will become one of the outstanding tackles in Navy history. A converted high school fullback lately become a tackle, he has all the ingredients of greatness. He is still a mere stripling of 19 and weighs just 230, but wait until he grows up. The little guy, Dick Dagampat, did everything but take the air out of the ball against Army. He recovered a free punt. He blocked with authority and ran with a vengeance. Incidentally, he also scored Navy's touchdown.

If Army could have hung on to the ball they would have won with ease. They seemed to have a better knowledge of where to run and when. For the most part they scrambled less than Navy and seemed to have a better organized offensive plan. Superiority is shown by the fact that Army had the ball for 75 plays to 51 for Navy and gained 237 to 132 yards.

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