SI Vault
 
The Question: How do you feel about All-America football teams?
Jimmy Jemail
December 03, 1956
DONALD A. QUARLESSecretary of the Air ForceThe All-America must have greater ability than others in his area. Publicity gives him a national reputation, but he rates it. The great Otto Graham claims that publicity more than ability helped make him an All-America. I'm sure the pros who played against him don't think so.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
December 03, 1956

The Question: How Do You Feel About All-america Football Teams?

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

DONALD A. QUARLES
Secretary of the Air Force
The All-America must have greater ability than others in his area. Publicity gives him a national reputation, but he rates it. The great Otto Graham claims that publicity more than ability helped make him an All-America. I'm sure the pros who played against him don't think so.

ADMIRAL ARTHUR W. RADFORD
Chairman
Joint Chiefs of Staff
The All-America team is a great American tradition. Some outstanding players who don't get a volume of publicity are overlooked, but those who are chosen are probably as good, even though they were fortunate in playing on teams that received national publicity.

BOB HOPE
Entertainer
Those picked undoubtedly deserve the honor. But it's the luck of the draw. The Cleveland Browns, the pro national or division champions for 10 years, have very few All-Americas. I'm told Defensive Captain Don Colo was never an All-America. But he was still a great player as a professional.

DAN TOPPING
Co-owner
New York Yankees
It's impossible for a group to pick a college All-America team where the 11 chosen are actually the best players in the country. Only in the pro league, where you can see every man play against every team, is it possible to pick the 11 top stars with absolute conviction.

AL KELLEY
Head football coach
Brown University
Every player selected for the All-America team deserves the honor. A player must get publicity to be selected, but he has to be good to get the publicity. However, other players could be selected, and they would deserve the honor. Some All-Americas have failed with the pros.

ROY KELLEY
ECAC football referee
Every All-America must have great ability and be a very exciting player. As Otto Graham said, publicity often gives a man the nod. Many football fans never heard of Tuffy Leemans before he played with the N.Y. Football Giants. Yet to this day he ranks as one of their greatest halfbacks.

RED GRANGE
NCAA Game-of-the-Week sportscaster
Without taking anything from the All-Americas, I'd say that they're all good but not always the best. Although the experts scan the powerhouses and do their best, I've seen many kids that were never heard of become greater pro players than their teammates who were selected as All-Americas.

GEORGE C. WILSON III
President
Wilson Chemical Co.
Publicity is a big factor in the All-America, but some college players with great ability earn the respect and admiration of sports-writers. They deserve all the publicity they get. The College All-Stars, made up of All-America selectees, have licked the champions of the professional league.

MAX KASE
N.Y. Journal-American Sports editor
There is a great deal of merit in these selections. However, there are so many good football players on the national scene that an occasional back who gets the loudest drum beats is picked over better players. The pros know those who are missed and often draft them over the publicized All-Americas.

TED SMITS
Sports editor
Associated Press
The All-Americas are built by more than just publicity. The A.P. takes a cold look at all the college players. Take 1928 when we picked Dutch Clark of little Colorado College as the All-America quarterback. A lot of people laughed at us, but we were certain he was the best.

Continue Story
1 2