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19th HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
December 03, 1956
FOOTBALL: THE VIEW FROM STANFORD Sirs:This is not a hot-stove letter—we're just plain hot about the article concerning John Brodie and Stanford's recent loss to UCLA (SI, Nov. 12). It seems that Mr. Murray has joined the ranks of those misguided individuals who feel so sorry for "poor little" UCLA and are out to get those "nasty ole" Stanford Indians.
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December 03, 1956

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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FOOTBALL: THE VIEW FROM STANFORD
Sirs:
This is not a hot-stove letter—we're just plain hot about the article concerning John Brodie and Stanford's recent loss to UCLA (SI, Nov. 12). It seems that Mr. Murray has joined the ranks of those misguided individuals who feel so sorry for "poor little" UCLA and are out to get those "nasty ole" Stanford Indians.

We are referring to those staunch crusaders who are continually heaping abuse upon Stanford for its recent stand against professionalism in the PCC. In casting the lone vote against the proposal of making guilty seniors eligible for five games, Stanford took the only ethical stand. Either they were eligible or ineligible; there can be no compromising of fundamental principles. It is absurd to have a player half-eligible.

We have been urged by our administration to bear this abuse with a mature patience. We are sick and tired of turning the other cheek. We have had to endure taunts of "purity boys," "saints with halos," and, last but not least, Mr. Murray's denotation of " Stanford's simon-pures."

It might also interest Mr. Murray to know that there were a few apathetic Stanford students (3,000) who put up their poker chips and were unable to go to the library Saturday morning because they were cheering their heads off at the Los Angeles Coliseum.

We too are able to quote Shakespeare, as is "Lucky" Henry Sanders:

If their-purgation did consist in words,
They are innocent as grace itself:
Let it suffice thee that I trust thee not.
(As You Like It, Act I, Scene iii).
CHUCK BONWELL
MIKE FRANCHETTI
DAVID A. DUNCAN
Stanford, Calif.

? James Murray, a firm admirer of Mr. Brodie and Stanford's relaxed attitude toward football, asks, "What have I done that thou dar'st wag thy tongue in noise so rude against me?" (Hamlet, Act III, Scene iv). And the editors add: If Stanford took the proper stand, which we believe it did, why should its. undergraduate Indians be so self-conscious—ED.

FOOTBALL: TWO MUCH PRACTICE
Sirs:
I have read with interest the investigation and recommendations made by SPORTS ILLUSTRATED and also by the Big Ten (SI, Oct. 29). As a former letterman from the University of Illinois I am quite familiar with Big Ten athletics.

There's one feature that was not much touched upon in your report. I refer to a definite tendency among many coaches to require more hours of practice from the athlete than he can afford to give and still maintain his academic standing. I had a very good basketball coach, Ralph Jones, who required our time only from 4 to 6:30 p.m. each day.

On the other hand, there is a college basketball player working for me here now who had to leave one of the schools in the South because he had been required to practice from about 3:30 until almost 7 p.m., and when he got home he was too tired to study.

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