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EVENTS & DISCOVERIES
November 05, 1956
LOST: ONE GOOD OLYMPIC TEAM, RAY ELIOT OF THE ILLINI, VIRGINIAN FROM TEHERAN, SECRET LIFE OF WALTER ALSTON, AN AXE FALLS IN CHICAGO, ADDING MACHINE FOR UPPERCUTS, CHEERS FOR LANDY
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November 05, 1956

Events & Discoveries

LOST: ONE GOOD OLYMPIC TEAM, RAY ELIOT OF THE ILLINI, VIRGINIAN FROM TEHERAN, SECRET LIFE OF WALTER ALSTON, AN AXE FALLS IN CHICAGO, ADDING MACHINE FOR UPPERCUTS, CHEERS FOR LANDY

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SCRATCH THE HUNGARIANS

Out of the crackle of confused reports that swirled from Budapest last week came one hard item of information—of relatively minor importance perhaps when compared to the momentous demonstration that freedom still lives in Magyar hearts, but yet important in itself: the Hungarian Olympic team, said the Budapest radio, will not go to Melbourne. The revolt, said Budapest, has "interrupted their training."

Budapest's reason, of course, makes no sense. It is far more likely that Hungary's Red government simply doesn't trust its Olympians. In any case, the decision is a shame.

Next month in Australia, Hungary was scheduled to unveil some of the greatest athletes ever to be seen at an Olympic Games. Athletes such as the famous distance runners S�ndor Iharos, L�szl� T�bori, Istv�n R�zsav�lgyi and J�zsef Kov�cs, who among them have smashed a double handful of world records; steeplechasers such as S�ndor Rozsny�i (who recently broke another world record) and L�szl� Jeszenszky; the discus man, Ferenc Klics; and the 1952 Olympic hammer throw champion, J�zsef Czerm�k—who, along with G�bor Benedek, silver medalist in the 1952 pentathlon, has already been killed in the fighting.

The Hungarian water polo team is the world's best; two sabremen, Al�dar Gerevich and Rudolf K�rp�ti, were gold-medal favorites among those who know fencing; �va Sz�kely, the defending breaststroke champion, led a team of women which included the strong backstroke contender, �va Pajor, and the freestyler, Katalina Sz�ke.

They were scheduled to leave Budapest last Sunday night, moving in easy stages by two chartered airliners across southeast Europe and into India, on to Singapore and Indonesia and eventually to Melbourne, stopping frequently to rest and work out and perhaps to spread a little good will.

The loss of the Hungarians at the XVIth Olympiad will be a small price for the lessons Hungary has just given the world. But sportsmen of all nations will miss them, and will meanwhile hope Budapest reconsiders.

UP, MR. ELIOT

As readers of this magazine know, SPORTS ILLUSTRATED inaugurates this year a new kind of All-America honors list. It will be known as the Silver Anniversary All-America and the laurels will go to senior lettermen of the football fall of 1931, for accomplishment in chosen careers and in community service since graduation.

Nominations are still coming in as this issue goes to press, and it will be a while before the nominations go to the Board of Judges. But the University of Illinois could not have chosen a more opportune time than last Saturday morning to send word that its nominee for Silver Anniversary honors will be a fellow named Ray Eliot, who happens to be varsity football coach at the University of Illinois right now.

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