SI Vault
 
19th HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
October 29, 1956
THE DRAMA OF OCT. 15Sirs:Last April I meant to write you to tell you that your Special Baseball Issue marked the coming of age of the best magazine in the country. I never did get around to doing it, and the same thing happened when your Special Football Issue came out early this fall.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
October 29, 1956

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

THE DRAMA OF OCT. 15
Sirs:
Last April I meant to write you to tell you that your Special Baseball Issue marked the coming of age of the best magazine in the country. I never did get around to doing it, and the same thing happened when your Special Football Issue came out early this fall.

But I've got to sit down now and tell you that SPORTS ILLUSTRATED's Oct. 15 issue was the most entertaining and worthwhile issue of any magazine I have ever read. The drama of the World Series was magnificent, a perfect blend of words and pictures to recreate that amazing cliff-hanger. SPECTACLE was truly spectacular—in fact, awe-inspiring. Your football coverage has been great from the beginning of the season, and the Vanderbilt story was told with precision and insight.

Congratulations on a job well done. In two years you have become old pros.
HARVEY H. H. CLENDENING
New York

SPORTING INSTINCT
Sirs:
Orchids to your gambling editor for leaving two pages open in the Oct. 15 issue for the unexpected to happen in the Series. It did.
EARL TAYLOR
Henderson, Nev.

PAYMENT DEFERRED
Sirs:
Gerald Holland's article Casey in the Stretch (SI, Oct. 1) was of particular interest to us because we made the offer to Casey to redeem for $483.05 the old uniform which he had taken with him in lieu of back pay when the Kankakee team disbanded in 1910.

As you reported, Casey was unable to locate the uniform in his sister's attic. He has now suggested to us in a recent letter that we donate the $483.05 to the local Little League teams. We will definitely do this and have asked Stengel to revisit Kankakee, where he began his baseball career, and personally present our check to the "future baseball big leaguers" in our behalf.
WILLIAM A. SCHNEIDER, President
Kankakee Federal Savings and Loan Assn.
Kankakee, Ill.

OCTOBER SONG
Sirs:
The month is October. The forests are flame-colored, and the iridescent trout has gone the way of all summer's mysteries. Persistent autumn has nudged out the fleeting exuberance of summer. We are content.

Then we read William Saroyan's eulogy (SI, Oct. 22) to baseball and the Yankees, that great Univac of the diamond. And he has brought back all the sorrow, wretchedness, pain, disappointment, anxiety and bitterness which time has helped to heal.

Mr. Saroyan is an articulate reporter, but perhaps his perception has failed him, for he has missed a rather basic point. He has missed the guiding spirit, a very real spirit, which has commanded the Dodgers—this year, and last year, and 10 years ago when Ducky Medwick loped out to the field. Perhaps this spirit is beyond Mr. Saroyan's conception or understanding. It is a spirit which has impelled our beloved Snider, Campanella, Maglie and the rest to insane, impossible feats. It is a spirit which remains when the last player has left the clubhouse. It is a spirit that often pervades the ancient marriage of hero and hero-worshiper. We call it love.

Chances are there will never be a Robinsonville or a Furillo Park. Your formidable and gargantuan Yankees will no doubt go unscathed in the record books. But then, Ozymandias was once mighty, but he didn't have it—and neither do the Yankees.
ROSEANN SAMUELS
Brooklyn

Continue Story
1 2 3