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AROUND THE COUNTRY
Don Parker
October 08, 1956
With all the major teams now in action, national rankings began to come into clearer focus. The big three of the Big Ten—Michigan State, Michigan and Ohio State—were on exhibition for the first time; so was Oklahoma. After the way they performed against extraterritorial opposition, there could be no doubt but that they proved the merit of those prophets who had picked them to lead the national rankings. Georgia Tech, another early favorite, was again on the winners' list, but again not so impressively as might have been expected. Still, with the season so young, form was beginning to tell. It confirmed the suspicion that Tennessee, under perfectionist Bowden Wyatt, is a power to be recognized; that Mississippi is indeed a true southern giant, not just a Gulliver. Pittsburgh's Panthers alone lived up to the great expectations of the East.
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October 08, 1956

Around The Country

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With all the major teams now in action, national rankings began to come into clearer focus. The big three of the Big Ten—Michigan State, Michigan and Ohio State—were on exhibition for the first time; so was Oklahoma. After the way they performed against extraterritorial opposition, there could be no doubt but that they proved the merit of those prophets who had picked them to lead the national rankings. Georgia Tech, another early favorite, was again on the winners' list, but again not so impressively as might have been expected. Still, with the season so young, form was beginning to tell. It confirmed the suspicion that Tennessee, under perfectionist Bowden Wyatt, is a power to be recognized; that Mississippi is indeed a true southern giant, not just a Gulliver. Pittsburgh's Panthers alone lived up to the great expectations of the East.

THE EAST

All the giants of eastern football stepped onstage last Saturday and, when they put on their acts, some of them looked like mighty scrawny giants.

Mighty Yale , heavily favored to toy with little Connecticut , staggered from the field at half time like a poleaxed bull on the short end of a 14-6 score. Coach Jordan Olivar got his reeling giant back on its feet for two third-period touchdowns and a 19-14 win but, even so, Connecticut was on Yale's three-yard line as the game ended.

Army, yet another supposed bully boy, showed dangerous cracks in its armor in beating VMI 32-12 at West Point. The Black Knights swept to two quick first-period touchdowns and then were taken aback as the Virginians punched across two of their own, slicker and quicker. This disregard for Army's reputation forced Coach Earl Blaik to use his first unit for most of the game, and the win was costly. Gene Mikelonis, Blaik's "best back," suffered a torn knee ligament and will be out for the rest of the season.

Colgate mauled Cornell 34-6, showing no respect for the Big Red's No. 2 Ivy League rating, while Pittsburgh topped Syracuse 14-7 in a battle for the East's No. 1 rating. Navy used its entire team (39 players) to rip William and Mary 39-14. The Middie reserves rose to the occasion by outscoring the first team 20-19.

Penn State extended Pennsylvania's losing streak to 19 games (longest in the country among major colleges) with a 34-0 win at Franklin Field. The Nittany Lion offense was varied (three touchdowns by ground, two by air) and should provide a tough test for Army next week.

Williams unleashed a lusty running attack that broke Trinity's 15-game winning streak 46-7 and set the Ephmen up as Little Three title favorites. Williams sophomores, up from last year's spectacular freshman squad, made the difference. Other scores:

Brown 20, Columbia 0
Dartmouth 13, New Hampshire 0
Princeton 28, Rutgers 6
Lafayette 20, Temple 0
Delaware 33, Lehigh 7
Union 13, Vermont 6
Maine 40, Rhode Island 7
Boston U. 19, Massachusetts 6
Springfield 28, Amherst 7
Middlebury 21, Wesleyan 6

THE SOUTH

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