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THE NIGHT WATCH
September 10, 1956
The nocturnal glow of baseball is vividly shown in the remarkable photographs on the next four pages. The night game is now unquestionably the backbone, the blood, the meat and potatoes of the national pastime. At the same moment (9:07 p.m., E.D.T.) as hundreds of serious bleacher fans under the gaudy center field scoreboard in Yankee Stadium stared intently at Yankee First Baseman Bill Skowron batting against White Sox Pitcher Dick Donovan, five other major league games were in progress and a sixth was due to start in less than an hour. The stands (and the till) were filled, or at least far more than they would be the next afternoon in the glare of the old-fashioned sun. It's good business, though the players dislike the irregular life.
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September 10, 1956

The Night Watch

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The nocturnal glow of baseball is vividly shown in the remarkable photographs on the next four pages. The night game is now unquestionably the backbone, the blood, the meat and potatoes of the national pastime. At the same moment (9:07 p.m., E.D.T.) as hundreds of serious bleacher fans under the gaudy center field scoreboard in Yankee Stadium stared intently at Yankee First Baseman Bill Skowron batting against White Sox Pitcher Dick Donovan, five other major league games were in progress and a sixth was due to start in less than an hour. The stands (and the till) were filled, or at least far more than they would be the next afternoon in the glare of the old-fashioned sun. It's good business, though the players dislike the irregular life.

PIGEON'S-EYE VIEW OF YANKEE STADIUM UNDERLINES IMMENSITY OF MICKEY MANTLE'S NEAR OUT-OF-THE-PARK HOME RUN WHICH CRASHED AGAINST THE FILIGREE AT TOP OF PICTURE

PRESS BOX WRITERS IN THE MEZZANINE GO TO WORK AS FANS FILE OUT AFTER GAME

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