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TED WILLIAMS DEFIES HIS CRITICS
August 20, 1956
There has never been a major league ballplayer like Ted Williams. No one has ever, for so long, attracted so much adulation for his prowess while earning so much censure for his personal gestures and attitudes.
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August 20, 1956

Ted Williams Defies His Critics

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There has never been a major league ballplayer like Ted Williams. No one has ever, for so long, attracted so much adulation for his prowess while earning so much censure for his personal gestures and attitudes.

Here is a fair sampling of the newspaper rocks which have been hurled at him through the years, the biggest of which came after last week's now famous spitting episode when Ted so clearly expressed his feelings toward his old enemies, both writers and fans, at Boston's Fenway Park:

"One of the finest young hitters to come to the big leagues in a number of years is Ted Williams of the Boston Red Sox. You couldn't call him a fresh young man, perhaps not cocky, either, but he wasn't shortchanged at the self-reliance counter."—JOE WILLIAMS, N.Y. WORLD-TELEGRAM, 10/23/40

"If his noodle swells another inch, Master Ted Williams of the Boston Red Sox won't be able to get his hat on with a shoehorn. For when it comes to arrogant and ungrateful athletes, this one leads the league."—JACK MILEY, N.Y. POST, 8/19/40

"You've sat sullen and aloof in locker rooms and hotels. Often you've looked lazy and careless on fly balls. Occasionally you've snarled things back at the bleacherites. You've taken the attitude, sometimes, that you're bigger than the game."—DUKE LAKE, BOSTON AMERICAN, 8/18/40

" Williams' temperamental outbursts are nothing new. His displays of temperament on other occasions have caused his own followers in Boston to razz him."—LEONARD COHEN, N.Y. POST, 5/13/46

"To get a real line on Williams you have to see his face in the clubhouse after a game which the Red Sox have won and in which he's gone hitless. That tells the story."—JACK ORR, N.Y. COMPASS, 5/5/50

" Williams removed himself from the ranks of decent sportsmen. Yesterday he was a little man, and in his ungovernable rage, a dirty little man."—BOSTON AMERICAN, MAY 1950

"Anybody who saw him in the holiday double-header would say the Boston fans are justified in anything up to throwing him into the Charles River...his one long hit of the day was well belted, but he gave up and settled for a double."—JACK ORR, N.Y. COMPASS, 6/2/50

" Williams is a peculiar cuss, so tangled in his inner man that even a psychologist or psychiatrist would have trouble unraveling him. He is more hated than liked by those who know him best." ARTHUR DALEY, N.Y. TIMES, 1/11/52

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