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THE WOMEN PROS PRO AND CON
Betty Hicks
July 23, 1956
Competition among top professional women golfers is tougher than ever, but the purses are bigger, too
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July 23, 1956

The Women Pros Pro And Con

Competition among top professional women golfers is tougher than ever, but the purses are bigger, too

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If there are others who have shown ability, or even a hint of it, they have yet to draw praise from their sister professionals.

The future top names in women's professional golf may be forecast with extreme accuracy because of a single fact: professional tournament golf cannot be learned quickly or easily. This is why, at 37, Betty Jameson says resolutely, "I am still learning." And, at 28, Betsy Rawls believes, "I am only beginning."

This is why young Mickey Wright came off the golf course last month in the Triangle Round Robin, after shooting consecutive rounds of 69-79, sagged onto the locker-room bench, and said, " Suggs wouldn't have done that, would she? Suggs wouldn't have tried to knock it out of the trees left-handed. Suggs wouldn't have whiffed three in a row. Suggs wouldn't have had a 9 on that hole."

"No," said Betsy Rawls, " Suggs wouldn't have tried to knock it out left-handed."

Her professional apprenticeship is not an altogether pleasant process for Mickey Wright. But in those moments when she feels the game has flogged her, Mickey may console herself by knowing that she has synchronized her golf career with fortunate fate. Some of her competitors reached their peak performances in years of lesser purses and fame. Mickey will achieve her greatest skill in the era of women's professional golf which promises to be its most rewarding.

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