SI Vault
 
19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
July 23, 1956
THE SANCTITY OF SPORTS Sirs: I was distressed to read your description of the first "politathlon" (E & D, July 2), and I was the more disturbed when I saw that you had continued the subject the following week. The implication of the two pieces is decidedly political, and the importance of their subjects to the world of sport is dubious. Since SPORTS ILLUSTRATED has devoted itself to sports, why then let us stick to sports and sports alone, unadulterated by political selections (if such a thing is possible in an election year). I would indeed be loth to see the most enjoyable of my sanctuaries sullied by the dark influences of the world's second oldest profession. ALAN ROTH New York
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
July 23, 1956

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

HOW GOOD IT ALL WAS
Sirs:
This one time I will not put it off! I have just finished Olympians Are Your Neighbors (SI, July 9), and it is essential that I tell you how good I thought it was.

I am not a follower of track and field, but I did watch the Olympic trials on television. As I read your article I again felt the thrill of watching Tom Courtney burst through to win his race. A few "beads of perspiration" came to my eyes when I thought of Whitfield who had tried so hard, had deserved so much and gotten so little.
DAVID MARGOLIS
Philadelphia

JUST IN CASE...
Sirs:
I am in a real stew over the trials out in Los Angeles.

It is beyond my understanding how truly great track and field men of Sime's and Bragg's caliber can be out of the Olympics. I am beginning to agree with some of the English writers that England has the best and fairest way of picking men for the Olympic team.
ALICE GOODWIN
New York

DON'T GIVE THEM A HARD TIME
Sirs:
It is not my contention that the three athletes qualifying in each event are actually the best in the United States, but they did come through under terrific pressure.

This same pressure will be present at the Olympic Games.

A team picked by a committee would result in tremendous repercussions long after the Olympic Games were completed as different localities would be up in arms because their Johnny wasn't selected.

The United States Olympic Committee would have had a hard time selecting men even in some of our so-called weak events. Take for instance the 5,000-meter run. Starting with the first performance in 1920 and ending in 1955, a grand total of 21 Americans had bettered 15 minutes for the event, according to my research, whereas this season no less than 16 runners accomplished that feat. With so many first-class athletes in each event a final elimination test has to be staged to separate three representatives from the rest of the pack.

Many thanks to Roy Terrell, who brought me a solid month of topnotch reporting.

M/SGT. ROBERT A. GILMORE, USAF Great Falls, Mont.

Continue Story
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8