SI Vault
 
SPORTING TOUR OF EUROPE
July 16, 1956
The sports and games pictured here by John Groth's imaginative brush and pen are as indigenous to Europe as its ancient soil. These are the vigorous contests which Europeans stage among themselves as they have for many centuries. The rugged stone-lifting matches of the Basques, Holland's ring tilting, the horse race in Siena's lovely square are all imbued with traditions that lend them even greater color and excitement. "With all of the action, the color, the historical events," wrote Groth on his return, "the artist really has everything his heart desires. I would recommend to any friend who plans a European trip that he build his itinerary around the summer's sporting events."
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July 16, 1956

Sporting Tour Of Europe

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The sports and games pictured here by John Groth's imaginative brush and pen are as indigenous to Europe as its ancient soil. These are the vigorous contests which Europeans stage among themselves as they have for many centuries. The rugged stone-lifting matches of the Basques, Holland's ring tilting, the horse race in Siena's lovely square are all imbued with traditions that lend them even greater color and excitement. "With all of the action, the color, the historical events," wrote Groth on his return, "the artist really has everything his heart desires. I would recommend to any friend who plans a European trip that he build his itinerary around the summer's sporting events."

BASQUE GAMES
"The Basques are a rugged people, and the sports at their festivals are close to the soil. Log chopping, stone lifting, stone drilling, scything and other country contests, music and folk dancing, are features of the games."

RING TILTING, HOLLAND
"This sport dates back to the Middle Ages when knights in full armor participated. Today in Walcheren, Dutch farmers riding saddleless workhorses carry on. This year's tilting falls on market day, lending it added color."

BULLFIGHT, NAVARRE
"A Spanish holiday is not complete without a bullfight. Villages without arenas use carts, barrels and wagons to make impromptu bull rings. The toreros are generally local boys."

THE 'PALIO,' ITALY
"This famous annual race is so popular that it has to be run twice each tourist season in Siena's beautiful square. Jockeys riding bareback race for the honor of their contrade. Losing jockeys were still fighting angry bettors when I left the square after the race."

'CONCOURS HIPPIQUE,' FRANCE
"Trotting races through the roped-off streets of Orthez featured a three-day carnival sport program that included bowling and pelota and created a colorful turmoil in this picturesque Pyrenees city. Bullfights and street dancing round out this joyous country fair."

CROSSBOWMEN, ITALY
"Teams of Swiss, Austrian, West German and Italian bowmen compete in international tournament in Gubbio's medieval square. In this uniquely situated mountain town, the century-old buildings are beautifully preserved, and when the entire population dresses up in costume for a pageant, like the figures in the background here, the whole town is a perfect stage."

RUNNING OF THE BULLS, SPAIN
"At dawn in Pamplona at festival time the fighting bulls chase the young men through the narrow streets. The course runs from the cattle cars at the railroad station to the Plaza de Toros. The San Fermin Fiesta is a religious festival, with bullfights, processions, games."

PELOTA, SPAIN
"Every village in northern Spain owns at least one pelota fronton. The game is similar to jai alai, and is passionately played. The courts are always busy—in the afternoon the boys, in the early evening the men. I sketched these priests playing in a village near Burgos."

PAMPLONA'S DANCING MEN
"No one sleeps in Pamplona during the festival. People stream down from villages in the hills to join the celebration. Pamplona's boys, at least those that survive the horns of the bulls, dance, sing and drink in endless festive joy for 24 hours of each of the 14 days."

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