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19th Hole: THE READERS TAKE OVER
July 16, 1956
TOWARD THE SUMMIT Sirs:Thanks and kudos for Dorothy Stull's admirably informative and judicious reporting of the President's Annapolis Conference on Physical Fitness (SI, July 2). She ended her valuable article well by quoting Dr. Hans Kraus, to whom American schoolmen generally owe more than they can ever repay, "In this conference...we've reached the first ledge in the climb for national fitness."FREDERICK RAND ROGERS Brooklyn
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July 16, 1956

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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The fault lies not with the Cincinnatians, who were only more clever and diligent than the fans of other cities, but with the Commissioner's office which first gives its blessing to this voting system and then allows the miscarriage in the voting to stand.

For me, the 1956 All-Star Game will not start until after the third inning when, I hope, Walt Alston puts on the field a representative National League team.
ALAN L. CLEM
Washington, D.C.

TAKE IT AWAY
Sirs:
We agree that the All-Star Game should be taken away from the fans. Certainly, some Cincinnati Reds should be on the team in '56, but we hardly think Roy McMillan outplays Ernie Banks. Ernie is the best shortstop to play in the majors since Honus Wagner.
J. B. DONNELLON
Mt. Vernon, N.Y.

BLACK FRIDAY
Sirs:
Is the game being played in Cincinnati? Or were only Cincinnatians' votes counted?

No repeaters from last year? Roy McMillan over Ernie Banks? No Musial or Spider?

The day the selections were announced was Black Friday in baseball.
BRUCE M. STEPHEN
Park Ridge, Ill.

A TOOT FROM CINCINNATI
Sirs:
None of the five Cincinnati Redlegs who were voted as starting players for the National League team are shown on the July 9 cover. And yet two National League players, Ernie Banks and Duke Snider, are featured. Aren't you guilty of presumption? Haven't you been guessing on the choice of the fans? Back here in Cincinnati we have become inured to being overlooked by the erudite sportswriters in the Gotham area, but occasionally we sound our own horn.
HOWARD J. BRINDLEY
Cincinnati

THE CASE FOR THE STATE DEPARTMENT ATHLETE
Sirs:
Mr. Avery Brundage, president of the International Olympic Committee, in discussing abuses in amateur sports is quoted assaying (SI, Feb. 6): "The State Department sponsors tours of our athletes to other countries. This sounds all right, on the surface. But what is it if it isn't using amateur athletes for political purposes?"

Mr. Brundage asks a question; he deserves an answer. So do the American people and our foreign friends in other lands who have played hosts to our great athletes while on goodwill tours abroad.

The American public, through Congress, gave the State Department a mandate: to conduct an educational exchange program with the free countries of the world so that we may all come to know each other better. Within this program we exchange teachers, students, scholars and national leaders. In presenting abroad the various facets of our country's life we have elected not to exclude the sports area, for to do so would result in a distorted picture of our country, where sports are so much a part of our way of life. It is within the framework of this exchange program that outstanding American athletes have gone to other countries.

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