SI Vault
 
19th HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
June 10, 1957
TV BASEBALL (CONT.): PITTSBURGH Sirs:Mr. Fred Wilson of Detroit (19TH HOLE, MAY 27) has started something—better than hot-stove discussions! He has nominated two of his own baseball announcers as president and vice-president of the Never Give the Score Club, and you replied that nominations are open. Here in Pittsburgh, the home, or rather the hiding place, of the Fighting Bucs, I proudly give you our two baseball announcers, men with sonorous, excitement-tinged voices, who can dramatically outlung Harry (every play is a crisis) Wismer and Bill (Orson Welles) Stern, but unfortunately pride themselves on telling you yesterday's events with tomorrow's chances while today's game is in progress. Our No. 1 boy is chairman of the board of the "All opponent home runs are wind-blown flies" corporation and also president of "All opposition singles hit lucky pebbles or air pockets" association. Our No. 2 man, who actually has a less aggravating voice, shares the crown with No. 1, as co-head of "We may know nuttin' about baseball but, boy, we're dramatic" club.E. N. ARONSON, D.D.S. Pittsburgh
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
June 10, 1957

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

TV BASEBALL (CONT.): PITTSBURGH
Sirs:
Mr. Fred Wilson of Detroit (19TH HOLE, MAY 27) has started something—better than hot-stove discussions! He has nominated two of his own baseball announcers as president and vice-president of the Never Give the Score Club, and you replied that nominations are open. Here in Pittsburgh, the home, or rather the hiding place, of the Fighting Bucs, I proudly give you our two baseball announcers, men with sonorous, excitement-tinged voices, who can dramatically outlung Harry (every play is a crisis) Wismer and Bill ( Orson Welles) Stern, but unfortunately pride themselves on telling you yesterday's events with tomorrow's chances while today's game is in progress. Our No. 1 boy is chairman of the board of the "All opponent home runs are wind-blown flies" corporation and also president of "All opposition singles hit lucky pebbles or air pockets" association. Our No. 2 man, who actually has a less aggravating voice, shares the crown with No. 1, as co-head of "We may know nuttin' about baseball but, boy, we're dramatic" club.
E. N. ARONSON, D.D.S.
Pittsburgh

TV BASEBALL: DETROIT REVISITED
Sirs:
In reply to Fred Wilson's letter concerning the alleged deficiencies of Van Patrick and Mel Ott, the Detroit Tiger TV and radio announcers, I have been listening to the Tiger broadcasts for several years and have never been kept in the dark for more than five minutes as to "what's the score?"

Both Mr. Ott and Mr. Patrick are intelligent observers of the game, and—to me, most important—they do not insert blatant commercialism into every play, such as "that drive hit the Wheaties sign on the left-field fence."
HARRY SALTZBURG
Toledo

TV BASEBALL: VOICE OF EXPERIENCE
Sirs:
I wonder if any of your readers noticed a remarkable broadcasting alertness on the part of Phil Rizzuto, the old Yankee shortstop now on TV, in the game between the Yankees and Kansas City at the Stadium on May 16. A broadcaster's job is to report what is going on in the field, explaining what is shown on the TV screen, but Rizzuto in this instance went them one better by describing a critical play before it happened, aided of course by his years of experience in baseball.

In the second inning of this game, Turley, the Yankee pitcher, started out by passing the first two men to face him, and Kellner, the next man up, naturally bunted to speed them on their way. The bunt went up instead of down, however, and the ball had hardly met the bat when Rizzuto excitedly called out, "Why, it's going to be a triple play!" And that is how the play developed. The ball went into an easy popup straight at the pitcher, Turley caught it on the fly to make the first out, whirled and slammed it to McDougald at second base to catch the runner on his way back from third, and the shortstop shot it to first base, covered by Bobby Richardson, the second baseman, in time to catch the runner there who was returning from his trip to second base. The whole play was over in almost less time than it takes to describe it, but little Phil had foreseen it from the start. The first triple play in almost two years went into the books—one of the prettiest and rarest plays in baseball.
THEODORE W. KNAUTH
New York

TV BASEBALL: DIZMANTICS
Sirs:
Please add to your growing list of Dean-isms (E & D, May 6; 19TH HOLE, May 20) one I picked up on the first Game of the Week telecast of this season. Dizzy referred to Buddy Blattner's dwelling as his "homecile." It took me a week to recover.
L. E. BRACKEN
Dillon, S.C.

DREAM RACE FOR SPRINTERS
Sirs:
I would like to suggest a series of three dream races for sprinters. There aren't many big races for sprinters, so the competitors will be the cream of the crop. The ideal time for such a group of races would be in August, at a midwestern track, probably Washington Park.

Swoon's Son, Decathlon, the Claiborne fillies and anything that Calumet has to offer will be stabled at Washington. Also, Hollywood Park will just have closed, so Mister Gus, Find and Bobby Brocato will all be heading for Chicago. And since the Carter Handicap will have already been run, Nance's Lad and Jet Action will be free to come. Boston Doge, now making a comeback, has no set schedule in New England, so he'll be able to make it. If some of these can't race, such able substitutes as Blessbull and Decimal can be called in, while Sea O Erin and Dogoon will be on the grounds at Washington.

I think these races should be run under equal weights. And if the weights were about 118 or 120, there could be no excuses. The best distances are 6, 6� and 7 furlongs.
MIKE RESNICK
Highland Park, Ill.

?A start toward the imaginative dream races outlined by Mr. Resnick was made by Suffolk Downs's John Pappas, who offered to stage a match race between the two sensational sprinters Boston Doge and Decathlon for a winner-take-all purse of $30,000 over six furlongs at 122 pounds. Boston Doge's owner has accepted, but Rollie Shepp, trainer of Decathlon, declared his horse not yet ready. But there is hope.—ED.

Continue Story
1 2 3