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THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF SPORT
May 27, 1957
FOR SPRING, FOR COLLEGE AND FOR SAIL
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May 27, 1957

The Wonderful World Of Sport

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FOR SPRING, FOR COLLEGE AND FOR SAIL

Spring showed its squally side for girl sailors from 10 eastern colleges who met in dinghy competition at the Pembroke Invitational Regatta on Providence's Seekonk River. The girls were out to prove that they can sail every bit as well as men—and they prettily established their point. They jockeyed their dinghies up to the starting line in hotly competitive fashion, rounded the marks of the figure-eight course with sporty sharpness and—like small-boat sailors anywhere—lodged a spray of "Buoy room!" protests. Nonetheless, despite two or three collisions, the invasion of the course by a large oil tanker, a dismasting and an upset in the gusty wind, the full day's racing series was a clear success. Connecticut College, Mount Holyoke and Middlebury finished 1-2-3 for the day.

Middlebury's Corliss Knapp, who won third place, bails dinghy.

Holyoke's Nan Pilcher, drying out, discusses races with Middlebury's Nancy Sharp.

Pembroke Hostess Joyce Knowles and Betty Weed of Wheaton get dinghies ready.

Leading fleet, winners Judy Sawtelle and Katty Lloyd-Rees of Connecticut College get set to round buoy.

TO LONDON TO START THE GRAND TOUR

Time was when the grand tour consisted of a stately but slow procession by carriage through the capitals of Europe. The other day, 40 Americans and their wives set off on a novel modern variant. All had one thing in common—they were members of the Triumph Sports Owners Association, and had decided to buy the new Triumph TR3, a zippy little number manufactured in Coventry, England. When they heard the news, the Triumph brass made a grand gesture—they chartered a plane, invited their U.S. fans to fly over and pick up their new cars at London Airport to have a Continental grand tour before shipping the cars back home to the U.S. The Americans were delighted.

The chartered plane taxied to a stop directly beside a lotful of sports cars. Each lady was presented with a bouquet; while the gentlemen were handed fistfuls of maps and official documents. Presently the Americans were off on an itinerary which included Stratford-upon-Avon, Coventry (for a look at the assembly line), France, Belgium, Austria and Switzerland—a jaunt of some 2,000 miles and a most pleasant way to break in a new car.

Car dealer David Thomas, Long Beach, Calif., holding wife's bouquet, has a chat with Mrs. Vernes Schact.

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