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EVENTS & DISCOVERIES
March 18, 1957
MICKEY AND THE MACHINE AGE, A LONG PROBLEM FOR BRAGG, DEMARET'S WEARING ON THE GREEN, A FRESH START FOR THE STRIPERS, DIM RED LIGHT ON FOOTBALL
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March 18, 1957

Events & Discoveries

MICKEY AND THE MACHINE AGE, A LONG PROBLEM FOR BRAGG, DEMARET'S WEARING ON THE GREEN, A FRESH START FOR THE STRIPERS, DIM RED LIGHT ON FOOTBALL

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1957

1956

(Bizmac est.)

(official)

Mantle

.342

.353

Ashburn

.328

.303

Williams

.322

.345

Kuenn

.319

.332

Minoso

.317

.316

Furillo

.314

.289

PROGRESS REPORT

The Missouri Valley Conference committee investigating rumors of fixes in basketball games refereed by John Fraser, which were first reported to the conference by Dr. Harry Corbin of the University of Wichita and the Rev. Paul Reinert, S.J., president of St. Louis University, met for five hours in St. Louis last week. There had been no indications that an inquiry was in progress until the rumors were printed in SPORTS ILLUSTRATED in the March 4 issue, although in a news release after the meeting the committee said the investigation began on February 15.

The committee examined the films of one of the games (nine games were involved), interviewed Fraser and announced at the session's end that "it has not found any solid facts to substantiate reports by [ SPORTS ILLUSTRATED] that one of its referees was involved in a basketball fix."

The news release reported that Missouri Valley athletic directors, coaches and sportswriters had been asked for "leads and information" and that the same request had gone to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED. Coaches and officials had expressed confidence in Fraser's integrity, the news release said, but there was "concern" that SPORTS ILLUSTRATED was not physically represented at the meeting.

Actually, SPORTS ILLUSTRATED was represented by "leads and information" supplied the committee at the request of the Rev. Charles Sanderson, S.J., of St. Louis University, president of the conference. The committee's tentative conclusion would indicate that these leads have not been fully developed or else not properly evaluated. However, the committee says its inquiry will continue, as it certainly should.

BIZMAC AT BAT

Bizmac, an electronic creation of the Radio Corporation of America, labors during the week solving problems in logistics on ordnance supplies at the Army Ordnance Tank-Automotive Command in Detroit. Weekends, apparently, Bizmac and its human directors share a human curiosity about the great American summer preoccupation, baseball. Recently, Bizmac digested some statistics on the batting-average ups and downs of several major league stars and, after two or three seconds' reflection, provided some feed-back forecasts for 1957. This qualifies Bizmac for membership in the Hot Stove League of America and indicates that mechanical computers can be, relatively, human. Bizmac based its guesses on the batting averages of the last five years and, presumably, did not consider Ted Williams' propensity for spitting at fans or Mickey Mantle's sore knee. Remembering, then, that Bizmac is projecting from incomplete data, here are some figures to file away until the season ends:

[This article contains a table. Please see hardcopy of magazine or PDF.]

If we are to accept Bizmac's electronic estimation, age will wither Ted Williams 23 points and stale Mantle 11. On the other hand, Richie Ashburn and Carl Furillo, like old wines, will improve. If Bizmac comes through all right, you can expect a wider range of forecasts next year. If not, let's have the Army start some pencil-work re-checks on those ordnance solutions.

LONG JOURNEY INTO HEIGHT

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