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YOUNG MARRIEDS OF FOOTBALL
January 14, 1957
The dinner and dance following the Sugar Bowl at New Orleans made a happy break to the long training grind for both the winners from Baylor and the losers from Tennessee, and it also dramatized a noteworthy contemporary fact: the typical college football player may very well be married, often to a coed, and have a youngster or two. For instance, 19 of the 44 Baylor players and 11 of the 44 Tennessee players had wives, many of whom came to the game and helped celebrate the victory or soften the defeat, as shown on these two pages. Baylor authorities officially smile on marriage as a "steadying influence," but it wasn't until Coach Bowden Wyatt arrived at Tennessee in 1955 that the Volunteers decided wedlock wasn't "harmful" for the athletes. This seems evident from the expressions of all the Baylor players except Charley Horton, the guard, whose wife was home in Waco, Texas, having just given birth to their first child. The happy faces also reflect twice-beaten Baylor's 13-7 upset victory over unbeaten Tennessee. Due largely to the big, alert Baylor line, which outweighed the Vols by 16 pounds per man, the Bears spent the afternoon smothering Tennessee's tricky, single-wing attack (a form of offense Baylor had never seen) before Tennessee could spring All-America Tailback John Majors for any costly gains. But on the first night of 1957 the rock and sock of the gridiron was forgotten, and that evening the formations were designed simply for the fun of it all.
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January 14, 1957

Young Marrieds Of Football

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The dinner and dance following the Sugar Bowl at New Orleans made a happy break to the long training grind for both the winners from Baylor and the losers from Tennessee, and it also dramatized a noteworthy contemporary fact: the typical college football player may very well be married, often to a coed, and have a youngster or two. For instance, 19 of the 44 Baylor players and 11 of the 44 Tennessee players had wives, many of whom came to the game and helped celebrate the victory or soften the defeat, as shown on these two pages. Baylor authorities officially smile on marriage as a "steadying influence," but it wasn't until Coach Bowden Wyatt arrived at Tennessee in 1955 that the Volunteers decided wedlock wasn't "harmful" for the athletes. This seems evident from the expressions of all the Baylor players except Charley Horton, the guard, whose wife was home in Waco, Texas, having just given birth to their first child. The happy faces also reflect twice-beaten Baylor's 13-7 upset victory over unbeaten Tennessee. Due largely to the big, alert Baylor line, which outweighed the Vols by 16 pounds per man, the Bears spent the afternoon smothering Tennessee's tricky, single-wing attack (a form of offense Baylor had never seen) before Tennessee could spring All-America Tailback John Majors for any costly gains. But on the first night of 1957 the rock and sock of the gridiron was forgotten, and that evening the formations were designed simply for the fun of it all.

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