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MOST DRAMATIC SINGLE PERFORMANCE
Paul O'Neil
January 07, 1957
No one had ever pitched a no-hit game in World Series competition before. No one had pitched a perfect game in the major leagues since 1922. And no one was noticing Don Larsen of the New York Yankees in the first place, since his opponent in this fifth game of the 1956 Series, the heroic Sal Maglie of the Brooklyn Dodgers, was pitching brilliantly. But after Maglie's dreams of glory were ruined by a sudden home run in the fourth inning, attention swung with mounting intensity to Larsen as he methodically overpowered batter after batter, inning after inning. Into the ninth he pitched, with the world watching. Maglie said: "I know how he felt, and I felt sorry for him." But Donald James Larsen mopped his brow, threw the ball without winding up, got the last three outs and wrote The Perfect World Series Game into sports history.
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January 07, 1957

Most Dramatic Single Performance

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No one had ever pitched a no-hit game in World Series competition before. No one had pitched a perfect game in the major leagues since 1922. And no one was noticing Don Larsen of the New York Yankees in the first place, since his opponent in this fifth game of the 1956 Series, the heroic Sal Maglie of the Brooklyn Dodgers, was pitching brilliantly. But after Maglie's dreams of glory were ruined by a sudden home run in the fourth inning, attention swung with mounting intensity to Larsen as he methodically overpowered batter after batter, inning after inning. Into the ninth he pitched, with the world watching. Maglie said: "I know how he felt, and I felt sorry for him." But Donald James Larsen mopped his brow, threw the ball without winding up, got the last three outs and wrote The Perfect World Series Game into sports history.

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