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DOWN GOES CHA-CHA-CHA
Alice Higgins
October 28, 1957
In the slashed and eroded ground around the National Equestrian Association, pupils of General Humberto Mariles find the severest tests which horse and rider can encounter. "I take them to all sorts of different places," the general says, "and as they become more advanced the terrain is made more difficult. Some of them cry when I tell them it is too soon for them to go cross-country. They are so eager they want to jump their horses over the moon in less than a month. But when I finally tell them they are ready, they believe in me; they know I won't ask them to do anything they are not able to do. So when I tell them to do it, they are not afraid." On the opposite page, and on the three pages following, Adalina (Cha-cha-cha) Manero, one of the general's students, vividly illustrates the truth of what he says.
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October 28, 1957

Down Goes Cha-cha-cha

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In the slashed and eroded ground around the National Equestrian Association, pupils of General Humberto Mariles find the severest tests which horse and rider can encounter. "I take them to all sorts of different places," the general says, "and as they become more advanced the terrain is made more difficult. Some of them cry when I tell them it is too soon for them to go cross-country. They are so eager they want to jump their horses over the moon in less than a month. But when I finally tell them they are ready, they believe in me; they know I won't ask them to do anything they are not able to do. So when I tell them to do it, they are not afraid." On the opposite page, and on the three pages following, Adalina (Cha-cha-cha) Manero, one of the general's students, vividly illustrates the truth of what he says.

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