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BRITANNIA RULES
Henry Longhurst
October 21, 1957
The golf expert of the London Sunday Times cheers Britain's famous victory in the Ryder Cup, but deplores some had manners on both sides stimulated by the slaughter of Goliath
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October 21, 1957

Britannia Rules

The golf expert of the London Sunday Times cheers Britain's famous victory in the Ryder Cup, but deplores some had manners on both sides stimulated by the slaughter of Goliath

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Again, to be dumped down in the center of an industrial city in a commercial hotel characterized by that form of yellow strip lighting which causes everyone to look as though he had jaundice and by an inability to serve breakfast at the hour made necessary by an early start to the match half an hour's drive away was not calculated to give our guests and their charming wives an idyllic impression of the "home of golf." If they could not wait to get away at the end, there was one Englishman who in his heart did not blame them.

Two years remain before the Ryder Cup match is due to be played again and, clearly, some hard thinking must be done on both sides. I suggest the following points:

One, the match should be made truly international and not between two closed-shop professional associations with restrictions which could this year exclude such stars as Middlecoff and Demaret.

Two, each country should appoint through the Royal and Ancient and the United States Golf Association acting in concert with the two PGAs an independent selection committee, thus doing away with the point system which resulted in the remarkable conclusion that Sam Snead was not among the 10 best golfers in America.

Three, the selection committees from each of our two countries should include the first two qualifications required by the USGA in choosing Walker Cup teams. I quote: "The principles which guide the executive committee in selection of international teams are: 1) Merit as a competitive golfer, based upon records in tournaments of importance in recent years. 2) Sportsmanship and general ability to represent the United States in international relations.... Selection of team members is not influenced by age or geography."

Four, a Ryder Cup fund should be raised to insure complete independence for the new truly international contest and the playing of it in circumstances worthy of its new status.

In the meantime, let it never be forgotten that this year's match represented a very remarkable golfing achievement on the part of the British. The other aspects may be quietly remembered but no longer mentioned. Thus out of a little evil might come forth great good.

[This article contains a table. Please see hardcopy of magazine or PDF.]

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