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19th HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
October 14, 1957
SPORTSMAN OF THE YEAR: NOMINATIONS OPEN (CONT.)Sirs:Since nominations for SPORTS ILLUS-TRATED'S Sportsman of the Year are now opened (19TH HOLE, Oct. 7) I would like to cite my choice for that distinction. It is Stirling Moss.
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October 14, 1957

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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SPORTSMAN OF THE YEAR: NOMINATIONS OPEN (CONT.)
Sirs:
Since nominations for SPORTS ILLUS-TRATED'S Sportsman of the Year are now opened (19TH HOLE, Oct. 7) I would like to cite my choice for that distinction. It is Stirling Moss.

Race driving demands great courage; thoughtful courage as opposed to brute bravery. Apart from mountaineering, no other sport courts death or affords the vision of your friends and rivals mangled, burned or dead.

Moss is intelligent and articulate, he writes readably about his cars and races. He has seen and weighed the risks, but nonetheless has expressed his private optimism by becoming engaged to be married to a woman who understands his unquenchable fire for racing. It is the flame, the passion and the dedication, allied to humour and understanding, that distinguishes for me the true sportsman in Stirling Moss.
ROGER BANNISTER
London

? Roger Bannister, SPORTS ILLUSTRAT-ED'S first Sportsman of the Year, bears as his distinction those same qualities.—ED.

SPECIAL FOOTBALL ISSUE: GREAT WORK, GUYS
Sirs:
The 1957 Football Issue (SI, Sept. 23) is the greatest football issue of SPORTS ILLUSTRATED or any other magazine covering football I've ever read. It's so amazingly comprehensive, it's hard to imagine all the great work you put into it.

Great work, guys—SPORTS ILLUSTRATED is just fantabulous!
HOWIE SCHWARTZ
Brooklyn

Sirs:
The edition issued earlier on baseball (Special Baseball Issue, April 15), together with the Football Issue make SPORTS ILLUSTRATED worth the price of subscription alone.
F. GLENN OTIS
Washington, D.C.

Sirs:
Your 128-page Football Issue was a solid hit—chiefly because of the picture and 15-line story of Gabby Hartnett and his epic 1938 home run. Apologies, but in these parts most of us are victims of an uncontrollable and incurable devotion to Gabby, the greatest catcher since, and including, Adam.
JIM MURPHY
Pawtucket, R.I.

EVASHEVSKI: MORE LIKE HIM
Sirs:
Iconoclast Evashevski has done this loyal heart proud (A Heretic Speaks his Mind, Special Football Issue, Sept. 23). How relieved could one person be to finally hear, openly and boldly, that there is one prominent coach who believes there is more to football than helping the hated enemy wipe off his uniform after a grinding, muddy tackle. Certainly, Evashevski will be snarled at, despised and completely ridiculed for his honest stand, but let me say here that he has earned my undying respect for putting football where it should always have been: pictured as the greatest of do-or-die sports.

I firmly believe that there should be no punishment for losing, as long as the loser has done everything within his mortal power to win and can truthfully vow that he could have done no better; but let's teach them not to lose.

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