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EVENTS & DISCOVERIES
October 07, 1957
T. S. ELIOT AT EBBETS FIELD, FINAL STANDINGS OF THE UMPIRES, LE DERNIER BARK, MEETING A CRISIS WITH FANGIO, VEECK'S LAW, LASKAU'S LAST WALK
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October 07, 1957

Events & Discoveries

T. S. ELIOT AT EBBETS FIELD, FINAL STANDINGS OF THE UMPIRES, LE DERNIER BARK, MEETING A CRISIS WITH FANGIO, VEECK'S LAW, LASKAU'S LAST WALK

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Save The Horse Week begins October 13.

ROAD TO MODENA

Gary Laughlin is a 35-year-old oilman from Fort Worth who was offered a ride from Milan to Modena the other night by Juan Manuel Fangio, the best driver in the world. Laughlin is alive; so are Fangio and Fangio's wife Andrea after a triumphant test of driving skill that belongs on the record. Here, as told to the British racing driver and correspondent Tom Wisdom, is Laughlin's story:

"We had passed the town of Fidenza, 50 miles from Modena, when it happened. In the darkness, just after 8 o'clock, we breasted a rise at 120 miles an hour. Seventy yards ahead was a truck right across the road—absolutely no room to pass. I knew I would be killed.

" Fangio spun his touring Lancia this way, then that. If we had braked we would have hit the truck head-on at 70 miles an hour, but the gyrations, expertly controlled, slowed the car. Just as I was sure we must hit, we glanced off a telegraph pole.... We stopped, inches from the truck.... Then the truck driver came for me. Who did I think I was, driving at that speed in the dark? Did I think I was Fangio?

" 'No,' I said, 'but he is.' I pointed to Fangio staggering across the road. The truck driver burst into tears."

In Bologna the Fangios received medical attention. Said Fangio: "People drive so badly today."

CHALLENGE TO TRADITION

"Never in the history of the major leagues has a ballplayer on a last-place club, whatever the magnitude of his accomplishments, received the Most Valuable Player award. Bill Veeck supplied the hard logic for all this when he was president of the eighth-place St. Louis Browns in 1951. Ned Garver had managed to win 20 games for the Brownies that year, so he went to Veeck for a raise. "Ned," Veeck told him, "we got to last place with you, we could surely have gotten there without you."

Veeck's Law notwithstanding, the left fielder for the tail-end Washington Senators will certainly get a passel of votes for the MVP award. He is Roy Sievers, 30, a strong, taciturn right-handed batter with a short swing which Yankee Manager Casey Stengel calls "one of the sweetest." Sievers surpassed Ted Williams and Mickey Mantle in home runs (42) and in runs batted in (114) while winning both of these titles. He has thus become the first Senator to take the RBI championship since Goose Goslin did it in 1924, and the first to win the home run crown since Buck Freeman hit 25 in 1899.

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