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19th HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
August 12, 1957
McDONOUGH'S MAGIC SHOVELSirs:Having read the interesting references to my favorite country (Mr. McDonough's Magic Shovel, SI, July 22 & 29), which I have visited on a number of occasions, where I soldiered north of Dublin and was about Dublin nine months in 1918, I have some, perhaps unusual, interest.
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August 12, 1957

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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McDONOUGH'S MAGIC SHOVEL
Sirs:
Having read the interesting references to my favorite country (Mr. McDonough's Magic Shovel, SI, July 22 & 29), which I have visited on a number of occasions, where I soldiered north of Dublin and was about Dublin nine months in 1918, I have some, perhaps unusual, interest.

I should like to ask Mr. McDonough if he is serious about developing a manufacturing organization in Ireland; and if this will serve both the British-controlled section in the north and the southern section under their own separate government.

We have dear friends in Ireland, particularly Dublin way, and we have scratched our heads a number of times regarding what we could make over there and if we could operate on a profitable basis. Getting these lads to work even with Guinness Stout never worried me, although it may be a problem, and Mr. McDonough's being in the shovel business should put him right in the driver's seat because digging peat is a prime business. But it wouldn't take long, if I read this article correctly, to make enough shovels to go around.
F. M. YOUNG
President
Young Radiator Co.
Racine, Wis.

?Mr. McDonough assures us that he is "serious enough to look hard" at the possibilities of commercial development. "I'm going over there again this fall," he says, "and I'm going to continue to look."—ED.

Sirs:
I am not sure that I entirely approve of the plan to industrialize Ireland as Mr. McDonough's Magic Shovel suggests. Let us preserve one beautiful spot in the world where work is still something to be taken in moderation, where tempers are cool and conversation is a flourishing art and the only tranquilizer required to meet the stresses and strains of life is that bottled by Mr. Guinness.

I do approve of the cinder running track, however, and enclose a small token donation which I hope you will be good enough to forward to Mr. Billy Morton.
MRS. JAMES PATRICK BLAKE
Kansas City, Mo.

Sirs:
I have just celebrated my 90th birthday, and I am happy to see that some Irish-Americans are going to get a chance to do something for Ireland. I congratulate you for your stories and Mr. McDonough for his enterprise. The enclosed contribution is for Dublin's cinder track.
TIMOTHY McCARTHY
St. Louis

Sirs:
The appearance of the second installment of Mr. McDonough's Magic Shovel started a warm and spirited discussion of Ireland's problems here among the guests at the Coronado Inn. Since none of us own a shovel factory we thought the least we could do is pass the hat for the enclosed contribution to the building of Ireland's first cinder track.
ED EDMUNDS
West Harwich, Mass.

? SPORTS ILLUSTRATED forwards all contributions to Mr. Billy Morton.—ED.

THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING McCARTHY
Sirs:
That was a very good piece by Horace Sutton on the Hamptons (SI, July 29). I enjoyed it doubly because I was vacationing in East Hampton at the time it came out. But he should have been more intrigued about why Restaurateur Herb McCarthy of Bowden Square wears, as Sutton puts it, "a starched white coat." It is not a white coat but a busboy's jacket!

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