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THE CUDGEL and THE RAPIER
Don Parker
December 02, 1957
?Event: the 58th meeting since 1890 between Army and Navy?Place: 102,000-seat Municipal Stadium, Philadelphia ?Broadcast: NBC Radio; NBC color TV (12 noon, E.S.T.)?1957 records: Army won 7, lost 1; Navy won 7, lost 1, tied 1
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December 02, 1957

The Cudgel And The Rapier

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?Event: the 58th meeting since 1890 between Army and Navy
?Place: 102,000-seat Municipal Stadium, Philadelphia
?Broadcast: NBC Radio; NBC color TV (12 noon, E.S.T.)
?1957 records: Army won 7, lost 1; Navy won 7, lost 1, tied 1

A football team—particularly a T-formation football team—tends to take on the personality of its quarterback, since he not only thinks for the team but also initiates each play. Nothing could illustrate this thesis better than the game coming up in Philadelphia's Municipal Stadium next Saturday when Army meets Navy. Army bludgeons the opposition, running through and over it with the power plays of the belly series that are so characteristic of its mow-'em-down offense. Navy, on the other hand, parries and feints like a man with a rapier—probing for a weakness in the center of the line, testing the strength of the flanks, throwing the long pass and then the short one, until finally the enemy has been outmaneuvered. Both teams are, in their different ways, characteristic of the two very different young men who will be guiding them.

Dave Bourland of Army is the machine. His mind is direct and methodical. "You got to form good habits," he says. "If something changes from what you're used to, you're in trouble."

Tom Forrestal of Navy is the gambler. "Figure out what they think you're going to do," he says. "Then do something else."

Both are 21, both are lithe and superbly coordinated, both are mature. But here the similarity ends.

Bourland is a deliberate Texan.

"I plan for a game," he will tell you, the muscles of his cheeks hardening. "I study a team's defenses, and I try to gauge my calls the way we scouted them. You got to have a plan in a game. You got to stick to it."

This is Bourland's biggest fault. He is not too adaptable, and he admits it. "When the game plan doesn't go—when another team changes the defenses I expect them to use—I get concerned. I usually ask my linemen for help in analyzing the new defense."

Forrestal is the opposite. He has an uncanny ability to pick out the weakness in a defense in a very few minutes. And if this cool young man ever gets concerned, he never shows it. He is an exceptional passer and a cagey play caller. At Annapolis they pull out that old clich� and say he has ice water in his veins.

Bourland has studied Forrestal in movies. After long hours of watching Navy's quarterback perform on the screen he offers this criticism:

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