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C. RONALD ELLIS AND FRIENDS
December 02, 1957
The 1960 Olympic Games are still two and a half years away, but the service clubs of Palm Springs, Calif. have the date clearly in mind—and they have devised an ingenious and admirable plan which, as it spreads, could make U.S. service clubs the principal financial sponsors of the U.S. squads at Rome and Squaw Valley. The scheme, known as the Palm Springs Plan, is simple enough: each service club member contributes 25� a year to a Palm Springs Olympic Fund chest. Since well over a million Americans are members of service clubs, and since the tab for travel and maintenance of U.S. Olympic athletes will be in the neighborhood of $1 million or so, the possibilities are obvious. Inventor's credit for the Palm Springs Plan goes to C. Ronald Ellis, president of the Palm Springs Rotary Club (at right in the picture above). But joining with him enthusiastically were his fellow service club presidents in the desert community (shown above with their guest of honor, the Rev. Bob Richards, at left). Pouring their first $118 worth of quarters into the Olympic "pot" are Presidents Roy Randolph, Optimist Club; Else Addes, Soroptimists; Elmer Walberg, Lions; James Perini, Kiwanis; and Roger Richards, the Exchange Clubs.
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December 02, 1957

C. Ronald Ellis And Friends

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The 1960 Olympic Games are still two and a half years away, but the service clubs of Palm Springs, Calif. have the date clearly in mind—and they have devised an ingenious and admirable plan which, as it spreads, could make U.S. service clubs the principal financial sponsors of the U.S. squads at Rome and Squaw Valley. The scheme, known as the Palm Springs Plan, is simple enough: each service club member contributes 25� a year to a Palm Springs Olympic Fund chest. Since well over a million Americans are members of service clubs, and since the tab for travel and maintenance of U.S. Olympic athletes will be in the neighborhood of $1 million or so, the possibilities are obvious. Inventor's credit for the Palm Springs Plan goes to C. Ronald Ellis, president of the Palm Springs Rotary Club (at right in the picture above). But joining with him enthusiastically were his fellow service club presidents in the desert community (shown above with their guest of honor, the Rev. Bob Richards, at left). Pouring their first $118 worth of quarters into the Olympic "pot" are Presidents Roy Randolph, Optimist Club; Else Addes, Soroptimists; Elmer Walberg, Lions; James Perini, Kiwanis; and Roger Richards, the Exchange Clubs.

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