SI Vault
 
FOR GENIUS AS USUAL
Paul O'Neil
December 23, 1957
Seldom in sports history have two careers so closely paralleled and duplicated one another as those of the National League's Sportsman of the Year Musial and the American League's stormy genius Ted Williams. In 19 years with the Boston Red Sox (of which five were spent in military service) he has built the third-highest (behind Cobb and Hornsby) lifetime batting average in history: .350. This year at 39 he hit a startling .388, to win his fifth batting championship and become the oldest player ever to turn the trick. The game has produced few such controversial personalities. But Williams is also a consummate artist and, in the classic phraseology of the inimitable Branch Rickey, "a man of courage—genuine courage; he is a person; he is ever the master of the situation and never its slave."
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
December 23, 1957

For Genius As Usual

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

Seldom in sports history have two careers so closely paralleled and duplicated one another as those of the National League's Sportsman of the Year Musial and the American League's stormy genius Ted Williams. In 19 years with the Boston Red Sox (of which five were spent in military service) he has built the third-highest (behind Cobb and Hornsby) lifetime batting average in history: .350. This year at 39 he hit a startling .388, to win his fifth batting championship and become the oldest player ever to turn the trick. The game has produced few such controversial personalities. But Williams is also a consummate artist and, in the classic phraseology of the inimitable Branch Rickey, "a man of courage—genuine courage; he is a person; he is ever the master of the situation and never its slave."

1