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VOICES IN THE WILDERNESS
April 13, 1959
In seattle, Wash. early last week, 104 citizens showed up at the U.S. courthouse to testify for—and against—Hubert Humphrey's Senate Bill 1123. And later in the week, 63 hotly declared themselves on the same subject in Phoenix, Ariz. The bill that touched off the polemics proposes a National Wilderness Preservation System and is Congress' third attempt in two years to create one. As law, S. 1123 would prescribe that some 50 million acres, carved from national forests, parks and game refuges, be left in a raw, wild and primitive state for "recreation, scenic, scientific, educational, conservation and historical use" only. The Wilderness, in the bill's words, would be one place "where the earth and its community of life are untrammeled by man, where man himself is a visitor who does not remain."
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April 13, 1959

Voices In The Wilderness

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MRS. JOHN VODAR JR.
I can speak only from the heart of a mother and a woman who loves this great, wonderful country of ours and the beauty God has given us to preserve and not destroy.

TESTIMONY OF THOSE AGAINST S. 1123

E. F. HEACOX
I am in the lumber business. Proponents of the bill imply immediate action is needed to save the last vestiges of wild land in the U.S. Facts do not support this.

COMMENT OF A TRIBESMAN

LESTER OLIVER
We Apaches feel all Indians affected should negotiate for an area based on the multiple-use principle. But to solve the problem maybe you ought to give the land back to the Indians. ("I've heard the Indians wouldn't take it," quipped Senator Barry Goldwater.) That's just Manhattan, Senator.

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