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WONDERFUL WORLD OF SPORT
June 08, 1959
SWEET SMELL OF FAILURE
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June 08, 1959

Wonderful World Of Sport

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THE 115 PITCHES OF HARVEY HADDIX

INNING

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

TOTALS

TOTAL PITCHES

13

10

7

12

4

8

8

7

9

6

6

14

11

115

BALLS

4

4

1

4

1

1

2

2

1

1

6

6

33

CALLED STRIKES

2

2

2

3

1

2

1

2

1

1

1

1

19

SWINGING STRIKES

1

2

2

1

4

2

1

2

1

1

3

20

FOULS

3

2

1

1

1

2

1

1

12

BASE HITS

1

1

SACRIFICES

1

1

ON BASE ON ERROR

1

1

POP-UPS

1

1

LINE DRIVES

1

1

2

GROUND-OUTS

1

2

1

1

2

1

1

1

2

12

FLY-OUTS

1

1

2

2

1

1

2

2

1

13

STRIKEOUTS

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

8

SWEET SMELL OF FAILURE

Someday, when people talk of the game Harvey Haddix pitched, they will want to remember that it was played in Milwaukee on a warm and muggy May evening in 1959, with lightning jagging across the sky to the southeast and gentle rains falling on the field from time to time. They will also want to remember that Lew Burdette was the opposing pitcher, that he gave up 12 hits but no runs and that it was Joe Adcock who, in the 13th inning, got the hit that beat Haddix, the only hit the left-hander gave up during the game.

The rest they will never forget. That Harvey Haddix of the Pittsburgh Pirates set down the Milwaukee Braves, man after man and inning after inning, until nine innings were over and not a man had reached first base. That the game was not over then because the Pirates themselves could not score. That for three more innings Haddix continued his incredible performance, a total of 36 batters retired in succession. And that finally an error, a sacrifice, an intentional walk and the hit made Harvey Haddix, who had pitched the best 12 innings in baseball history, a loser.

As early as the fourth inning, Haddix began to think about a no-hitter. So did others but, following baseball's curious tradition, no one mentioned it. In the Pirates' radio booth, Announcer Bob Prince danced all around the subject.

"First nine men up and down," he told the folks back home after three innings. "Haddix has zeroed the board," he said in the sixth. In the eighth he shouted, "Don't go away. We are on the verge of...baseball history." When the ninth inning was over, Prince screamed, "Harvey Haddix has pitched a perfect no-hit, no-run game." Then Prince lost his voice.

In the Pirates' dugout no one spoke to Haddix about the game. Only one Brave, Del Crandall, said anything. When Haddix batted in the 10th, Catcher Crandall said, "Say, you're pitching a pretty good game."

When the long game was over and he had lost, Haddix requested reporters to give him a few moments to himself. Presently he received them, dozens of them, answering their questions with admirable control.

"It was just another loss, and that's no good," he told those gathered about him. His face showed his disappointment, but his words did not. He had nothing but the best to say for his teammates, who were feeling wretched because they had failed to get Haddix just one run.

In the Braves' dressing room Lew Burdette, who had pitched masterfully himself, said, "He deserved to win."

Perhaps Harvey Haddix did deserve to win, but he did not, and his story may be stronger because of it. Baseball fans will be a long time forgetting his excellence in defeat.

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